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Thursday, July 21
 

9:00am

Prospects for a New Systemic Synthesis (Discussion)
2880 In a plenary session before lunch, five experts in different aspects of Systems Science (philosophy, engineering, science, theoretical exploration, methodology) reported on their current work and presented their views on the prospects of a new synthesis that could establish Systemology as a mainstream academic presence. In this break-out session they will answer audience questions about their work and their views, and discuss opportunities and challenges for the maturation and establishment of Systemology is a discipline. All conference attendees are invited to join in this wide-ranging discussion about the prospects and future of Systems Science.

Thursday July 21, 2016 9:00am - 10:00am
Benson 180

2:00pm

Anticipation and Systems Thinking: A Key to Resilient Systems
Disasters often endanger the foundations of our society. Due to many factors (larger popula- tion, more dependency on more complex technology, more and greater interference in natural systems and the environment, dramatic changes in the environment, ...) the number and the severity of disasters seem to grow, additionally exaggerated by the media coverage.The ultimate aim in the case of disaster is to save as many lives as possible and also safeguard the survival of the society in total and to protect as much of the societal structure, infrastructure and environment as possible. This requires the social system to show an amount of resistance and stability with respect to an incident that can cause endangering disasters.An incident of this kind can be attributed to the interaction of three overall factors: an external or internal hazard, a vulnerability of the system and an insufficient reactive capacity of the system to shield or resist the incident.With respect to the system’s capacity two countermeasures are essential to overcome an incident of that kind: * Anticipation of the incident and as a consequence the provision of adequate preparation and * Systemic Thinking in order to understand the relationship of and cybernetic loops within the components of the affected system and the incident.Anticipation and as a consequence a timely preparation of responses to future disasters will help to avoid the worst possible consequences and improve the chances for survival. Additionally we need a better understanding of the complex relationships causing the hazard and the long-term effects of our interventions on nature, human society, and environment: Systems Thinking.In this paper we analyze the key factors potentially leading to a system disturbance: Hazard, vulnerability of the affected system and capacity of the affected system. We classify these disturbances (incident, emergency, crisis, disaster, and catastrophe) and analyze the different reactions a system can show (fragile, fault tolerant, elastic, resilient, robust, antifragile). By discussing the phases of disaster management we can identify the information required for effective Anticipation and for the identification of critical systemic relationships. Finally we analyze the phases of Disaster Management, emphasizing the need for and the application of Anticipation. We identify the source of information needed for a successful anticipatory view. As a conclusion we identify systemic problems encountered during disaster management, especially in view of anticipatory actions.

Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

Thursday July 21, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 1B51

2:30pm

On the Information Processing Aspect of the Evolutionary Process
A premise of this paper is that the dynamics of any system, by which we mean here the collection of processes that perform its functions and thus achieve its purpose, needs information for the execution, control, and coordination of such processes. The information processing aspect of a dynamics is precisely what provides the information that it needs in order to proceed. The dynamics of the Earth ecosystem, for example, includes the processes that encompass the origin and evolution of life and the development of human society. In this paper I refer to the part of this all-encompassing process that includes the behavior and evolution of biological systems and human organizations as the evolutionary process. The main focus of the paper is the information processing aspect of this evolutionary process. More specifically, I focus on the evolution of the information processing capabilities of biological organisms and systems, including human individuals and organizations. Especially important is the emergence through this evolutionary process of increasingly complex structures that have made possible more complex behaviors and, consequently, more complex ways of processing information. Superimposed on this evolution is the creation and development of artificial means of information processing and the integration of their use into the information processing aspect of human individuals and organizations. The idea is to contribute to the understanding of the potential that the development and use of artificial information processing devices and systems offers for the effective support of the functions of modern organizations and their adaptability. However, the tremendous potential of computer-based information systems and information technology cannot be fully realized if they do not appropriately extend the information processing capabilities that exist at all levels of the dynamics of the organizations that they support. A sufficient understanding of the information processing aspect of this evolutionary process is in my opinion necessary for the appropriate, synergistic extension, with computer and information technology, of the information processing capabilities that already exist in modern organizations. 

Chairs
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.

Thursday July 21, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 265

6:00pm

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program Welcome Reception
STiP (grad course) Student Welcome
Instruction starts Friday before the conference, and continues through Saturday, after the conference. There are also Pre-conference and Post-conference assignments. Chairs: Ray Ison, Peter Tuddenham, Gary Metcalf, Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey.

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Thursday July 21, 2016 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS
 
Friday, July 22
 

9:00am

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 1 - Morning Session
Introductions:
• sharing individual research and systems trajectories
• working as a critical learning systems (CLS) community
• reviewing STiP experience & taking an overview of the course resources and program
• Emergent issues from your own experiences of Systems

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Friday July 22, 2016 9:00am - 1:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

9:00am

Recorded Video Stream from India
Limited Capacity seats available

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Friday July 22, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

2:00pm

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 1 - Afternoon Session
• STiP as the conservation of theoretical lineages and traditions
• Implications of these traditions for practice; research as a practice
• Modes of research (the PFMS heuristic)
• Introducing systemic inquiry in context of ISSS (SI session 1)

Friday July 22, 2016 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

6:00pm

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 1 - Evening Session
‘Walking our talk’: grounding what has been presented in your own context. Practical exercise over dinner

Friday July 22, 2016 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS
 
Saturday, July 23
 

7:15am

US-India Roundtable
Live Stream from #ISSS2016 India

Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Saturday July 23, 2016 7:15am - 8:15am
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado

9:00am

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 2 - Morning Session
• Welcoming ISSS Berlin alumni;
• Contextualising you and your PhD research
• Articulating your....PFMS ‘model’
• Forming inquiry groups
• Exploring contexts & emerging issues

Saturday July 23, 2016 9:00am - 1:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

1:00pm

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 2 - Afternoon Session
• Introducing and using systems, tools, techniques, methods and methodologies combined with group work;
• Skills/enthusiasm audit

Saturday July 23, 2016 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

6:00pm

ISSS Board Meeting
Attendance: Board of Directors, ISSS.

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Saturday July 23, 2016 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Taj Restaurant Basemar 2630 Baseline; 303-494-5216
 
Sunday, July 24
 

7:15am

US-India Roundtable
Live Stream from #ISSS2016 India

Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Sunday July 24, 2016 7:15am - 8:15am
ECCR 139 Engineering Building, University of Colorado

9:00am

9:00am

Delayed Video Broadcast from India
Limited Capacity seats available

Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Sunday July 24, 2016 9:00am - 6:00pm
ECCR 139 Engineering Building, University of Colorado

9:30am

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 3 - Professor Debora Hammond: Overview of Systems Lineages and Implications for Research
Speakers
avatar for Debora Hammond

Debora Hammond

Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Sonoma State University
Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Hutchins School of Liberal Studies at Sonoma State University since 1997. | Program Director of Organization Development Graduate Program since 2009. | Growing out of my on-going involvement with the International Society for the Systems Sciences, I was elected to serve as the 2005-2006 President and hosted the 50th anniversary conference at Sonoma State University, July 9-14, 2006. | My book on... Read More →


Sunday July 24, 2016 9:30am - 10:30am
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

9:30am

#ISSS2016 USA Registration
Chairs
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Sunday July 24, 2016 9:30am - 5:30pm
ECCR Lobby Engineering Building, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

10:00am

Systems Basics in Understanding System Wholeness 'Reuniting Nature and Humanity': The Oriental Systems Thinking In the Teaching of Buddha
2865 

Wholeness could be explained from an oriental point of view, but in the end it seems to coincide with modern western systems thinking. It starts from the concentration on the parts in Reductionistic thinking, to the concentration on wholeness in Systems thinking. The second step involved the combination of the observer and decision maker with the teaching of Buddha. Finally last step would be to investigate the structure of the environment.

The application of system theory requires the understanding of ourselves, each other, the nature,  the past and future possibilities in a systemic way. That is, we need to understand both the structure and dynamics of our physical body systems, and of our mental observers. Research shows that the composition of our body and that of our mind may be explained by the same system theory relating energy, matter, life and information. We employed this simple ancient system theory as taught by Buddha to investigate how our naturally systemic-structured mind artificially developed all this non-systemic and problematic thinkings.  We use our body to experience the world around us but our mind is the one who is observing and making the decisions to change the world. System theory sees the world composed of observers,decision makers, systems, the environment, the boundaries and the relationships among them. And there are two opposite forces in the world that constantly interacting with each other, creating the flow of energy, matter and information between systems and the environment. On one hand we have the disorder force governed by the second law of thermodynamics that drive everything into a equilibrium state with maximum entropy. On the other hand we have the organizational force governed by the constrains of a system that drive the system into a particular desired  steady state with a low entropy.
 
Our mind are both the observer and the decision maker with a major problem. Throughout our life we have been looking for satisfaction that brings happiness. Our government have been relying on economics to achieve this but 80% of the time we are dis-satisfied with the people and situations around us, bringing craving, aversion and ignorance into our minds and creating all sorts of problems in our society. This is called suffering in the teaching of Buddha, and he offered us with a three step solution for our mind. In this workshop we investigate the systemic view of these three steps namely self protection, concentration and purification of our mind. We also investigate a 10 days Vipassana mental healthcare program for people of all religions including scientific communities. It is believed such a program could bring happiness, peacefulness and harmony for our community. 

Death is the end of our lives or just the beginning of another new life? A system undergoes a transition of system state upon death, but will the system continue in other forms at other places? Or will it just terminate totally? What are the possible new system states and are they sustainable? In this workshop we will investigate the sustainability of Heaven, Hell, Earth and Nibbana (null). And we investigate the way to prepare ourselves to transit into these states.   

Speakers

Sunday July 24, 2016 10:00am - 12:00pm
ECCR 1B51
  • Host Organization ISSS

10:00am

Systems Processes Theory as a GST, Prototype Systems Science, and Knowledge Base for Systems Engineering & Sustainability
2932

The goals of the ISSS include researching a general theory of systems (GST) by discovering isomorphies, unifying science, and transferring models between disciplines. For 45 years, this speaker has been contributing to a Systems Processes Theory (SPT) which some have described as the most advanced and detailed, science-based theory of systems extant in attempting to fulfill that dream of ISSS Founders. This tutorial will condense several graduate, university-level core courses on SPT into one presentation. It will begin with the differences between the popular and widely known “systems thinking” and “systems philosophy” found in ISSS and the criteria for a true science of systems. It will then describe why study of isomorphic systems processes is of fundamental importance, how this school of thought teaches & provides evidence that systems processes are isomorphic between widely different systems, how studies of natural systems using the scientific method leads to strong evidence of how systems work in general, and how to find such GST isomorphies in the voluminous science literature. The results is a science-based theory having both unprecedented descriptive and prescriptive power. While the early Founders of GST focused mostly on the natural sciences and math, the present workers in ISSS mostly ignore the natural sciences and profess that belief in and awareness of systems alone is sufficient to guide applications. This line of research is an antidote to that approach. It will present many more candidate isomorphies than any other extant program of study. It will describe how data is being collected on 110 such candidate isomorphies to fill 26 information categories and produce a massive data base and bibliography. It will add the critically important additional step, not taken by ISSS Founders, of showing how these isomorphies impact and influence each other to achieve systems stability and dynamics (how systems work). It will try to show how such detail can be used to improve systems design, understand the new field of top-down systems pathology (how systems don’t work) to enhance systems repair & curation. It will show how this detail can be used as a stronger, more scientific knowledge base for new fields like sustainability and systems engineering which are themes of this conference. It will also indicate how this overall theory and knowledge base has been used for several funded programs in Systems Education in preparation for a Friday presentation on assessment of those attempts.

Format:
For each hour there will be 40 min of presentation followed immediately by 20 min of open discussion. Lunch will be brought in so that noon to 1 pm can also be used for open discussion. These basics can be supplemented by >17 hours of streaming video. This Pre-conference event will be cancelled if at least seven participants do not contact speaker at lrtroncale@cpp.edu stating intention to attend before the conference.

Speakers
avatar for Len Troncale

Len Troncale

Director, General Systems Research, Development, and Consulting
Dr. Len Troncale is Professor Emeritus of Cell and Molecular Biology, and past Chairman of the Biology Department at California State Polytechnic University. He is also Director of the Institute for Advanced Systems Studies, and Coordinator of its NSF-supported Systems Integrated Science General Education Program. He has served as VP and Managing Director of the International Society for General Systems Research (SGSR), and President of the... Read More →


Sunday July 24, 2016 10:00am - 5:00pm
ECCR 200
  • Host Organization ISSS

11:00am

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 3 - Professor Gary Metcalf: Social System Design and Institutional complexity: implications in the STiP field
Speakers
avatar for Gary Metcalf

Gary Metcalf

President, gmetcalf@InterConnectionsLLC.com
President, International Federation for Systems Research | Gary S. Metcalf received a PhD in Human Science in 2000 at the Saybrook Graduate School. His doctoral research was conducted under the mentorship of Béla H. Bánáthy, focused on Social Systems Design and Organizational Development.Metcalf began his professional career as a systems-oriented family therapist, then spent twelve years in large corporations... Read More →


Sunday July 24, 2016 11:00am - 12:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

12:00pm

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 3 - Panel Discussion
• Panel Discussion
• Small group explorations of implications (for your group SI and for your own research)

Sunday July 24, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

1:00pm

#ISSS2016 USA Student Program: Day 3 - Afternoon Session
• Skills/enthusiasm audit iteration;
• Clarifying tasks for the week
• Continuing a systemic inquiry at ISSS: (SI session 2)
• Contracting/protocols;
• Preliminary designs for final presentation

Sunday July 24, 2016 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Baker W112 Main Campus, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

2:00pm

Designing Digital Services: Unifying Information Systems Design and Service Systems Design
2735

Globally, information systems are gaining prominence and their proliferation has been substantial considering the rate of adoption by the masses.  Information systems facilitate design of solutions that are useful, usable, desirable, efficient, effective and different. People, technologies, and processes are brought together to address a problem by conceiving a solution that creates value for users. As a result, the world at large is witnessing a massive pace of digitization wherein businesses and governments are adopting different forms of information systems to connect to their customers in order to bring in a difference.  As a result, increasingly the term “Digital” has been utilize to characterize such information systems.

Digital is far more pervasive now than it was previously and its mass adoption has enabled information generation and application in diverse areas.  However, digital by itself is not beneficial to anyone.  Only when Digital enables a sector/domain, it becomes useful.

Businesses have realized the importance of digital as a differentiator in customer engagements so as to stay competitive and relevant in their respective areas of business.
They have also realized that digital has transformed social interactions, customer relationships, as well as reshaped the ability to access and leverage information.  They have experienced that business decisions are no longer based on opinions but on verifiable data.


To cope with this, businesses deal with interconnected, global systems that interact with multiple role players across multiple geographies, addressing multiple concerns of stakeholders across multiple disciplines by utilizing emerging technologies in a dynamic and challenging environment while providing near real time response and rich customer experience.  Over the last few decades, product companies who were traditionally involved in creating digital solutions have moved into service businesses as the market for their core product has reached maturity.  This is further prompted by the change in employment patterns, job opportunities, contribution to GDP and reduction in product sales and license fees.  However, such companies need ways and means for improving and standardizing their services as the reputation for the quality of their services is generally poor affecting their customer’s loyalty and brand image.  Since digital has standardized quality in other domains, it is obvious that digital can provide key advantages to these companies by improving quality of their services.  In this discussion, such digitally enhanced/enabled services are considered as digital services.  Digital service is an integration of people, processes, infrastructure and digital technologies, which are independent and operable, and which are networked together for a period of time to deliver a service for the benefit of another entity or the entity itself in real world.  The formation of the digital service is not a permanent phenomenon but rather a necessity for integrating and networking the different components to achieve the desired quality levels for the service.  The digital service emerges from a combination of the constituent elements (people, processes, infrastructure, and digital technologies), the interactions between themselves and their interactions with the customer’s environment.

While delivering digital services, businesses need to deal with interconnected, global systems, interact with collection of related services, multiple geographies, multiple stakeholders with differing concerns, multiple disciplines, emerging technologies, dynamic and challenging environment, interconnectivity and variety, near real time response and rich customer experience.  Digital services design aims at synthesizing services that are useful, usable and desirable from the consumer perspective, and efficient, effective and different from the provider perspective. It brings together people, skills, technology, methods and tools to address change and create value for customers. It involves solving multiple problems across multiple disciplines. It is iterative and requires participation of several stakeholders’ along with relevant domain experts. Existing service design methodologies are implicitly software/product design methodologies and they require tweaking to be applied in a servicing situation.

Applying the same mind-set to designing a service as to the design of product/software will lead to solutions that are possibly not appropriate to the servicing scenario. Services cannot be treated in the same way that software are treated and it is necessary to have a different perspective for designing services.  Currently, while numerous architectural frameworks and service design approaches as well as numerous digitization case-studies exist, a unified systematic approach for designing digital services does not exist.  In this workshop, the foundational concepts and the underlying processes for an approach to design digital services is presented.  

Keywords: Information Systems, Services, Digital Solutions, Digital Services, Architecting Digital Services, Transforming Digital Solutions, Enabling Services
 


Chairs
Speakers
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.


Sunday July 24, 2016 2:00pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 245
  • Host Organization ISSS

2:00pm

Introduction to Spiral Dynamics Integral
2849

This introductory workshop will teach you the fundamentals of the Spiral Dynamics integral (SDi) theory as developed by Dr. Don Beck. We can go as deep as the class wishes to go, and I will frame the conversation through the lens of SDi. We will balance learning through various styles (teaching, dialogue, a/v) and you will come away with an appreciation of the beauty as well as complexity of the model.Ben Levi has taught certified Level 1 and 2 courses with Dr. Beck for seven years, and has studied SDi and integral theory for sixteen years. 

Speakers
avatar for Ben Levi

Ben Levi

Spiral Wizard, 5 Deep Boulder
I have been an I.T. consultant for 30 years, specializing in Apple, Filemaker, and system design. I have studied and taught Spiral Dynamics integral since 2000, and spend about a third of the year in New Zealand where I am a permanent resident.



Sunday July 24, 2016 2:00pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 151
  • Host Organization ISSS

2:00pm

Living Systems Analysis Workshop
2948

Living systems analysis includes both qualitative and quantitative sciences.

Qualitative living systems are treated well in James Millers Living Systems.

Philosophers have been trying since the 18thcentury to develop a science of society based on laws of nature. The physical sciences are based on (1) the identification of universal phenomena, the relation among them and their measures (quantification).

The universal phenomena of things that live are: matter, energy, information, and knowledge.

These phenomena have been identified and quantified.  The quantification of living systems phenomena and their relations provide the basis of quantitative living systems analysis 

The universal phenomena of knowledge and information are recent discoveries.

Quantification of knowledge and information are currently at the cellular level.  The task before us is quantify knowledge and information at all levels from the cell up to and including humans and their organizations.   

Chairs
Sunday July 24, 2016 2:00pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 1B55
  • Host Organization ISSS

2:00pm

Multicultural World Views on Sustainability
2930 

Ancient, Native, Indigenous and Tribal cultures.

A 2 hour documentary film “Force of Nature” produced by David Suzuki Foundation, CA, will be shown as the main event for the workshop. The filmbuilds on Dr. Suzuki’s personal experiences and contrasts the main stream Western world view with the Indigenous world view for the survival of all life on our planet. An opinion letter to be published in Ancient Science titled “conscious world view Transforming Individuals, Science, its Education and Research by V. Gupta, I. Gupta and J. Saldarriaga, will be distributed to the participants well before the workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Vijay Gupta

Vijay Gupta

Professor Emeritus, University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences
Vijay K. Gupta is a professor emeritus in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, and is a fellow emeritus of the Cooperative Institute For Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado. Vijay has widely published in major research journals in hydrologic and atmospheric sciences, applied mathematics, probability theory, and nonlinear processes in geophysics. Soon after completing... Read More →
avatar for Dominique Surel

Dominique Surel

Dominique@EnergyMedicineUniversity.org
Dr. Dominique Surel specialize in the development of Intuitive Intelligence. She has created a unique methodology to enhance accuracy of intuitive insights by integrating the natural human skill of intuition with components of Controlled Remote Viewing (CRV) and critical thinking. The result is a flexible decision-making tool that integrates our cognitive skills with accurate intuitive insights.



Sunday July 24, 2016 2:00pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 265
  • Host Organization ISSS

2:00pm

Systems Basics in Understanding System Wholeness 'Reuniting Nature and Humanity': The Oriental Systems Thinking In Traditional Chinese Medicine
2866

The systemic thinking of the unification of nature and man has been the fundamental concept in traditional Chinese culture since around 500BC. The concept is also embedded in the teaching of Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The traditional Chinese system theories under investigation include the Taichi yin-yang system theory, the Five systems theory of the human mind, and the Traditional Chinese Medicine differential diagnosis-cure process. These theories are found to be related to different modern system theories compared including Viable system model.

Taichi yin-yang system theory describes the relationship between any two entities (element/process) at any level of interest. It concerns the quantitative and qualitative changes between the entities. This is related to causal loop diagram (CLD) in system dynamics which uses reinforcing loop and balancing loop. The observer is not specified in the theories, but the perspectives of the observer actually determine the entities, the unit of quantitative changes, and the ratio of qualitative changes.The Five systems theory of the human mind is one of the important concepts developed in the teaching of Buddha. The Five systems are: awareness, perspective, sensation, action and physical object. These five systems are able to describe the properties of the observer and the decision maker.

The Traditional Chinese Medicine differential diagnosis-cure process is a practical systemic process that has been used daily for more than 2000 years. It is believed that the whole macroscopic-microscopic spectrum of systems is suitable. The system state identification involves three pairs of direction-forming spectrums. The Superficial and Internal spectrum gathers information between the boundary and the system. The Cold and Hot spectrum gathers information between the form and function, or matter and energy within the system. The Deficient and Excess spectrum gathers information between the environment and the system. Strategy can then be formulated to regulate and maintain the system.

Keywords:
Reuniting Nature and Humanity, Buddhism, Causal loop diagram CLD, Confucianism, Five systems of human mind, General System Theory, Health and system thinking, quantitative and qualitative changes, Spirituality and Systems, System dynamics, Taichi Yin-Yang System Theory, Taoism, Buddha's teaching, Traditional Chinese Medicine differential diagnosis-cure process, Unification of nature and man, Viable system model VSM. 

Supporting Agencies:
Ancient Balance Medicine Research and Education Fund Foundation Ltd. 

Speakers

Sunday July 24, 2016 2:00pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 1B51
  • Host Organization ISSS

6:00pm

Opening Ceremony
Speakers
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Sunday July 24, 2016 6:00pm - 6:30pm
Visual Arts Complex Plaza

6:30pm

#ISSS2016 Welcome Reception
Chairs
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Sunday July 24, 2016 6:30pm - 8:30pm
University Memorial Centre (UMC) South Terrace and Tent University Memorial Centre (UMC), University of Colorado
  • Host Organization ISSS

8:00pm

60th Anniversary Ceremony
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Sunday July 24, 2016 8:00pm - 9:00pm
Visual Arts Complex Plaza
 
Monday, July 25
 

7:00am

Breakfast
C4C Meal Cards

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences



Monday July 25, 2016 7:00am - 8:30am
Centre for Community Dining Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

7:15am

ISSS2016 Roundtable Reflection
Limited Capacity seats available

Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences



Monday July 25, 2016 7:15am - 8:15am
Centre for Community (C4C) TreeHouse Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

8:29am

Plenary I: The Challenge of System(s) Sustainability
Description: This year’s conference focuses on what it means for a system to be sustainable (“systemic sustainability”): exploring more holistic science and thinking to understand, manage, and create sustainability in complex socio-ecological systems. We are intentionally stepping outside traditional comfort zones to explore new territory and possibly find new answers. For this we recognize the importance of empowering students; removing philosophical and institutional blocks to their inquiry into such questions, and providing them with the best tools to guide their research and practical experiences. From development of new theories and practices to integration of existing ones, our challenge is to determine what will lead society into the transformations needed for a sustainable future and beyond to even greater symbiotic and innovative opportunities; and how we as a society can help initiate those changes. [Chair: John Kineman]

Speakers
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →
avatar for Gunter Pauli

Gunter Pauli

Director and Chief Technology Officer, Blue Economy Holdings, Inc.
Gunter Pauli (1956) graduated as an economist with an MBA ant then established ten companies of which two failed. He has never had a job and has always worked independently. Inspired by Aurelio Peccei, the founder of the Club of Rome, he set out to pioneer and be the change he wanted to see in the world. His endeavors cover business, culture, science and education. He co-authored a book with Fritjof Capra that was the first book ever presented on... Read More →
avatar for Peter Tuddenham

Peter Tuddenham

College of Exploration, Executive Director, Systems Education at the International Society for the Systems Sciences, Vice President
​​Peter Tuddenham is Vice President for Systems Education at the International Society for the Systems Sciences, President / Executive Director of the College of Exploration and Vice President of Beta Resources Inc. and weconferences.com. ​
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 8:29am - 8:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

8:30am

Jennifer Wilby: Opening Announcements
Chairs
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 8:30am - 8:35am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

8:35am

John Kineman: Introduction and Conference Program: Realizing Sustainable Futures
Chairs
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 8:35am - 8:55am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

8:55am

Gunter Pauli: The Blue Economy: How innovations in technologies and business models set new rules for sustainability.
Chairs
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Gunter Pauli

Gunter Pauli

Director and Chief Technology Officer, Blue Economy Holdings, Inc.
Gunter Pauli (1956) graduated as an economist with an MBA ant then established ten companies of which two failed. He has never had a job and has always worked independently. Inspired by Aurelio Peccei, the founder of the Club of Rome, he set out to pioneer and be the change he wanted to see in the world. His endeavors cover business, culture, science and education. He co-authored a book with Fritjof Capra that was the first book ever presented on... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 8:55am - 9:35am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:35am

Peter Tuddenham: Systems Literacy Education Goals
Chairs
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Peter Tuddenham

Peter Tuddenham

College of Exploration, Executive Director, Systems Education at the International Society for the Systems Sciences, Vice President
​​Peter Tuddenham is Vice President for Systems Education at the International Society for the Systems Sciences, President / Executive Director of the College of Exploration and Vice President of Beta Resources Inc. and weconferences.com. ​

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 9:35am - 10:15am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:15am

Morning Break
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 10:15am - 10:30am
MATH Courtyard Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:29am

Plenary II: Towards Holistic Systems Thinking
Description: Although every environmental agency today is calling for ways to manage whole ecosystems, we do not know how to do that. Our theories and methods to address the question of whole-system sustainability are incomplete and as a result our actions regarding individual processes, sectors, and resources can contribute to problems as much or more than to solutions. How can systems thinking help us move to another level of understanding where we can address the pressing complex systemic issues of inter-related socio-ecological systems to resolve the dysfunction of their often contradictory sectors and components? [Chair: Judith Rosen]

Speakers
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:29am - 10:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:30am

Judith Rosen: What The Science of Anticipatory Systems Can Illuminate About Science Itself.
Chairs
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 10:30am - 11:15am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

11:15am

David Rousseau: Scientific principles for a general theory of whole systems.
Chairs
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 11:15am - 11:45am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

11:45am

Shankar Sankaran : Action Research Methods
Chairs
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 11:45am - 12:15pm
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

12:30pm

Lunch
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 12:30pm - 1:45pm
Centre for Community Dining Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

1:30pm

Developing an Understanding of Violence using the DSRP Theory as a Framework
2754 Cabrera and Cabrera’s DSRP model outlines the cognitive foundations for anything that arises. It proposes four mutually arising fundamentals: distinctions, systems, relationships and perspectives that are evident in any system. All living systems are complex adaptive systems that maintain their state through a flow of energy, resources and information across the system boundaries. Violence can be defined as the invasion of a boundary or the disruption of a flow across a boundary. When a boundary is set by a distinction, inside and outside is created. That which is excluded becomes the other and is often disowned, demonised and marginalised and thus becomes an easy target for violence. The parts of a system created by the boundary interact. Sometimes parts invade other parts so they are controlled by that part, thus impacting on the functioning of the whole system and reducing the requisite variety. The relationships between the parts can likewise be distorted, so that one part of the relationship uses power and control over the other. The parts have perspectives. A point of view makes one particular way of meaning making possible, but excludes others from being revealed. If people can be coerced into accepting one particular perspective, they can be deceived and thus have their behaviour controlled. Violence is thus a fundamental quality potentially inherent in all complex systems. Since complex adaptive systems are fractal, so is violence. We can thus gain an understanding of the patterns of violence at all fractal levels, from bacteria interacting to individual humans to whole societies. Violence springs from the same underlying systems dynamics, but is expressed in different ways depending on the level at which the system is operating. Galtung has identified three types of violence: direct, cultural and structural. Each of these will be discussed in relation to the DSRP model. Dutton’s Nested Ecological Model is used as a framework to explore factors behind the choice to use violence and makes the links to factors that tend to perpetuate violence from one generation to the next. Through being a victim of violence a person becomes vulnerable to factors that predispose them to perpetuating violence themselves. Having determined the way CAS are disrupted through violence, we can recognise the actions that will be needed to rebuild resilience and help restore the effective functions of the CAS and can thus formulate actions that may help reduce the likelihood of violence being passed on from generation to generation.

Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

Speakers
avatar for Victor MacGill

Victor MacGill

PhD Student, victor@vmacgill.net
ISSS StudentI am researching organisations that operate without a structured leadership


Monday July 25, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 1B51

1:30pm

From Systemystery to Systemastery - A Toolbox for Developing Systemry
2814 As systemists we need to be able to communicate using a common reference for the science of systems. Such a reference should provide a simple compelling framework for understanding systemist attitudes and systems concepts. It should be compelling for scientists, engineers and for people, even children, who are just starting out in their journey to understand systems. A candidate framework explored during the INCOSE international workshop in 2016 was used as a basis for developing a game at the IFSR conversation in 2016. The game is intended as a candidate contributor to Systems Literacy. The intended experience of the game is to help people to act in a systemic way when presented with a new situation. By playing the SysteMystery game the learners will be able to reflect on a situation and make improved decisions or judgements. Through playing the game learners will be able to grasp and expand their knowledge of core systems concepts. Through practice the learners will begin to naturally use concepts effectively when converting information into knowledge and forming their mental model of a bigger picture. Playing the game has three phases: a phase of experience which could be a story, game, poem, song or explanation of problem or situation; a phase of reflection and analysis of the experience using the SysteMystery cards and a post analysis phase where improvements to the SysteMystery framework are considered and fed-back to the repository.

Chairs
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 245

1:30pm

Industrial Ecology in Motion: A Theoretical Proposal for Innovation on SME's
2776 Since 80s and 90s industrial engineering research has been looking for new ways to handle and manage natural resources on the planet. Water sources contamination, waste generation, industrial treatments of these wastes and greenhouse gases produce consequences on communities’ quality of life, startling authorities and societies in general. As a result, there is an interest in the agenda of policy-makers and academics to generate innovative process and products around better ways to put closer production models and socio-ecological systems. Several initiatives has been proposed to accomplish this in the last years (e.g. cleaner production and pollution reduction) but only one seeks a holistic way to approach to problematic situations, Industrial Ecology (IE). IE has a relevant importance for systems sciences because this discipline understand natural and industrial process in a systemic way. IE try to perceive companies not only like productive isolated entities, but living components that change across time, take decisions and works on an ecological system. Also, IE see processes as complex systems where humans, material flows and technology are taking into account, evolving from unsustainable production forms to resilient and innovative structures. As such, small and middle enterprises (SME’s) are a research challenge to industrial engineering and IE. The differences between big industries and small production lie on usage of appropriate technologies for environmental management, intensive use of manpower and low control by policy-makers. Moreover, SME’s play a key role as part of the economy and source of innovation. This paper contribution is to understand the relationship between innovation process on strategies of environmental care and rules or routines at the organizational level on SME’s. The results of the interaction on each one of the firms on an economic environment or social system is to exchange goods and services using several incentives and rules. These rules are created, adopted, retained and abandoned by SME’s according to environmental, social and legal conditions, but also by selective pressures that modifies the system. Creating synergies for companies and their rules would lead to a stable and resilient behavior on a global scale. Therefore, using systemic thinking into an evolutionary way, where every heterogeneous and autonomous firm take environmental and economic decisions, self-organization processes will arise. As a result, innovative processes’ creation could be replicated and adapted by other SME’s. In this paper I will show a theoretical proposal for innovation on industrial ecology based on the evolutionary ontology proposed by Kurt Dopfer. I will also present the mechanisms of variation and selection at micro, meso and macro level and their relation with ecologically responsible and systemic viable decision-making process. Finally, the author will present several recommendations that will help to apply these strategies on the industry, from eco-industrial parks for SME’s to evolutionary models with agent-based simulations.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 151

1:30pm

On the Information Processing Aspect of the Evolutionary Process
2818 A premise of this paper is that the dynamics of any system, by which we mean here the collection of processes that perform its functions and thus achieve its purpose, needs information for the execution, control, and coordination of such processes. The information processing aspect of a dynamics is precisely what provides the information that it needs in order to proceed. The dynamics of the Earth ecosystem, for example, includes the processes that encompass the origin and evolution of life and the development of human society. In this paper I refer to the part of this all-encompassing process that includes the behavior and evolution of biological systems and human organizations as the evolutionary process. The main focus of the paper is the information processing aspect of this evolutionary process. More specifically, I focus on the evolution of the information processing capabilities of biological organisms and systems, including human individuals and organizations. Especially important is the emergence through this evolutionary process of increasingly complex structures that have made possible more complex behaviors and, consequently, more complex ways of processing information. Superimposed on this evolution is the creation and development of artificial means of information processing and the integration of their use into the information processing aspect of human individuals and organizations. The idea is to contribute to the understanding of the potential that the development and use of artificial information processing devices and systems offers for the effective support of the functions of modern organizations and their adaptability. However, the tremendous potential of computer-based information systems and information technology cannot be fully realized if they do not appropriately extend the information processing capabilities that exist at all levels of the dynamics of the organizations that they support. A sufficient understanding of the information processing aspect of this evolutionary process is in my opinion necessary for the appropriate, synergistic extension, with computer and information technology, of the information processing capabilities that already exist in modern organizations.

Chairs
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.

Monday July 25, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 265

1:30pm

Systems Thinking and Wildland Fire Management
2724 A changing climate, expanding ex-urban residential development, and increasing pressures on ecosystem services raise global concerns over growing losses associated with wildland fires. New management paradigms acknowledge that fire is inevitable and often uncontrollable, and focus on living with fire rather than attempting to eliminate it from the landscape. A notable example from the U.S. is the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy, which aims to bring multiple landowners and stakeholders together to achieve three broadly defined goals: resilient landscapes, fire-adapted human communities, and safe and effective response to fire. Implicit in the structure of these three goals is the nexus of three systems: the ecological system, the social system, and the fire management system, respectively. This systems-based structure reflects a perspective that contextualizes fire as a disturbance agent that influences and is in turn influenced by other agents and processes within a broader socio-ecological system. While the need for transformative system change is well-recognized, at least three central challenges remain: (1) the need to accept that how fires are managed is in many instances the limiting factor of system behaviour; (2) the need to improve our understanding of the characteristics and complexities of the fire management system itself; and (3) perhaps most fundamentally, the need to coherently apply systems analysis principles in order to improve system performance. In this presentation I will attempt to bridge these gaps by applying systems thinking to contemporary wildfire management issues in the U.S. One thread of the presentation will focus on synthesizing findings from various lines of fire-related research and identifying how collectively they reflect systemic flaws stemming from feedbacks, delays, bounded rationality, misaligned incentives, and other factors. Particular attention will be devoted to the “fire paradox,” whereby a legacy of fire exclusion in fire-prone forests has led to hazardous accumulations of flammable vegetation such that future fires burn with higher intensity and are more resistant to control; today’s “success” begets tomorrows failure. The second thread will outline a roadmap for redesigning the fire management system so that behaviour better aligns with purpose. This discussion will focus on recommended actions including breaking down institutional silos, investing in pre-fire assessment and planning, improving monitoring and performance evaluation, and adopting core risk management principles. Ideally this line of research will yield insights that can lead to meaningful systemic change and improved fire management outcomes.

Chairs
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 200

1:30pm

The Thinking Space: the Enactment of a Platform for Critical Systems Practice
2799 This paper focuses on describing the process of enactment of a ‘platform’, namely, The Thinking Space (TS), as a device for Critical Systems Practice CSP. This is part of a research project that generated a series of findings contributing to the study of the process whereby different systems methodologies, methods, tools and techniques are used in combination. This process is known as Critical Systems Practice (CSP). The study yielded ‘defensible generalisations’ from a series of research themes explored. These defensible generalisations or contributions relate to three research issues relevant to CSP, namely, (a) pluralism, (b) improvement, and (c) the role of the agent. The learning derived from these research themes led the researcher to formulate the ‘transferable problem solving capability’ of the study: the enactment of ‘platforms’ as devices for operationalising CSP. Platforms are defined as ‘organisational and intellectual spaces’ enacted by actors and evolving with the changing nature of actors’ moment-to-moment interactions, by means of engaging in a continuous mutual research endeavour and of engaging in enhancing collective competence, in order to pursue an informed practice (to pursue CSP). The study is the result of reflection and debate, which was reciprocally enriched by theory and practice. It presents the findings of an organisation-based action research project, where the researcher entered into a real-world situation and aimed both at improving it and acquiring knowledge about the experience. He became, for a period of three years, involved in the flux of ‘real-world problems’ within an engineering company that invited him to do research by using systems ideas in practice. This paper thus recapitulates on the contributions that this research endeavour had on the three research themes focusing on the emergence of a particular ‘platform’, the Thinking Space (TS), as a device for operationalising CSP; the fourth ‘emergent’ research theme. Concerning the ‘transferable problem solving capability’ of the study, the TS is one particular device considered to provide evidence for proposing the research theme of ‘platforms’. Keywords: platforms; Critical Systems Practice; transferable problem solving capability, pluralism; improvement; role of the agent This paper focuses on describing the process of enactment of a ‘platform’, namely, The Thinking Space (TS), as a device for Critical Systems Practice CSP. This is part of a research project that generated a series of findings contributing to the study of the process whereby different systems methodologies, methods, tools and techniques are used in combination. This process is known as Critical Systems Practice (CSP). The study yielded ‘defensible generalisations’ from a series of research themes explored. These defensible generalisations or contributions relate to three research issues relevant to CSP, namely, (a) pluralism, (b) improvement, and (c) the role of the agent. The learning derived from these research themes led the researcher to formulate the ‘transferable problem solving capability’ of the study: the enactment of ‘platforms’ as devices for operationalising CSP. Platforms are defined as ‘organisational and intellectual spaces’ enacted by actors and evolving with the changing nature of actors’ moment-to-moment interactions, by means of engaging in a continuous mutual research endeavour and of engaging in enhancing collective competence, in order to pursue an informed practice (to pursue CSP). The study is the result of reflection and debate, which was reciprocally enriched by theory and practice. It presents the findings of an organisation-based action research project, where the researcher entered into a real-world situation and aimed both at improving it and acquiring knowledge about the experience. He became, for a period of three years, involved in the flux of ‘real-world problems’ within an engineering company that invited him to do research by using systems ideas in practice. This paper thus recapitulates on the contributions that this research endeavour had on the three research themes focusing on the emergence of a particular ‘platform’, the Thinking Space (TS), as a device for operationalising CSP; the fourth ‘emergent’ research theme. Concerning the ‘transferable problem solving capability’ of the study, the TS is one particular device considered to provide evidence for proposing the research theme of ‘platforms’. Keywords: platforms; Critical Systems Practice; transferable problem solving capability, pluralism; improvement; role of the agent

Chairs
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 1B55

1:30pm

Discussion: Towards Systems Literacy - The Role of Systems Research
2886 This workshop will further develop the initiatives of the Systems Research Team (SRT), which met for the second time at the 2016 IFSR Conversation in Linz, Austria. This workshop furthers the development of the SRT’s work by integrating the 2014 and 2016 teams into a collaborative cohort of researchers, scholars and practitioners in the Systems Sciences. The combined SRT consists of: Mary Edson (team leader), Pam Buckle Henning, Tim Ferris, Debora Hammond, Andreas Hieronymi, Ray Ison, John Kineman, Louis Klein, Gary Metcalf, George Mobus, Nam Nguyen, David Rousseau, Shankar Sankaran, and Will Varey with consulting team member, Peter Tuddenham. Some of the primary goals of the SRT are to educate, inform, and invite engagement by interested individuals and institutions from diverse fields and disciplines in the Systems Sciences through Systems Research and Systems Literacy. BackgroundThe two meetings of the SRT have developed two streams of value to the Systems Sciences. The first stream, started in 2014, focused on development of systems researchers and the body of knowledge. The second stream, started in 2016, focuses on role of Systems Research in the Systems Literacy Initiative. The 2014 SRT’s focus was answering the question, “What distinguishes Systems Research from other types of research,” an internal focus intended to provide grounding for researchers new to the Systems Sciences. The outcome of this phase of the SRT’s work was the publication of a book, A Guide to Systems Research: Philosophy, Processes and Practice (Springer, 2016). The 2016 SRT’s focus is on reaching out to a broader community to provide a foundation for Systems Literacy. The team’s Conversation revolved around the question, “How can Systems Research be in service to Systems Literacy?” The team’s conversations were directed into two essential aspects, separate and integrated, of this question. In one aspect, Systems Research serves Systems Literacy by providing a credible foundation for the principles and practices of Systems Science and Systems Thinking in both systematic and systemic modes. In the other aspect, Systems Research provides a neutral frame for development of ethical applications of those principles and practices. The development of Systems Research in support Systems Literacy is the ongoing collaboration of the SRT. This workshop focuses on that development.Workshop DescriptionThe workshop will be conducted in two parts. In the first part, the SRT will review and revisit the team’s work to date, creating a foundation for development during this session. Two of the three hours of this workshop will be a working session devoted to unpacking the eight critical factors identified during the 2016 IFSR Conversation. These factors will serve as a basis for a Knowledge Base (KB) and an Investment Portfolio (IP) for Systems Literacy (SL). This portion of the workshop will be guided by David Rousseau (KB) and Ray Ison (IP). A Systems Analysis, guided by George Mobus, will further define and distinguish these critical factors as part of a SR/SL KB and IP. Further details of this process are provided in the following description (see Background). In the second part (the third hour) the SRT invites students, as well as researchers and other interested participants, to join a discussion about the newly published, Guide to Systems Research (see above). In this part of the session, how Systems Research contributes to establishment of a reliable KB from which SL can create a set of foundational principles will be explored, as well as identify systemic sensibilities for a broader audience.Why: Systems Research in Service to Systems LiteracyMotivation for development of a KB through SR for SL comes from theoretical and practical sources. The SRT recognizes the exigency in development of foundational principles of Systems Science and Systems Thinking that can be effectively adopted and disseminated through Systems Literacy. The team’s narrative begins with an understanding the urgency for application of Systems Sciences and Systems Thinking to wicked problems (Malik, 2016; Churchman, 1967; Rittel, 1973) and messes (Ackoff, 1974/97). Systems Research is typically a slow generation of results; however, the body of knowledge gained through this process can be confidently used to address complexity in timely ways. The criticality of the need for salient approaches to complexity is shown in a graphic representation of some possible trajectories of applying or not applying these Systems principles in practice. The ApproachThe choice of how we respond to these issues relates to a process model that can be applied. Through understanding the relationship of the process model to the trajectory, the team directed its focus to developing a MindMap of eight essential aspects or features of how Systems Research can support Systems Literacy. These include: Systems Science knowledge base, roles and personas, maturity models, role profile, ontology/vocabulary, perspective/framing choice, frameworks, and political ecology. Each of these eight has its own process of unpacking, which was demonstrated to the Conversation participants using the knowledge base. The eight relate to unpacking the Systems landscape in a coherent but loosely coupled investment portfolio (economic, social, and relational) for building systemic sensibility in such a way as to be dis/aggregated for different audiences.  After identifying eight, critical factors or components that form the structural aspects of the process our team decided to explore these factors further. The team developed a mind map of the critical factors (or ways of knowing) and developed separate mind maps of each of the factors. These factors need further unpacking (clarification, definition, and distinction), as well as systems analysis, to refine the process model that was developed during the Conversation. The purpose of this process is not about increasing the amount of systems books and papers in the KB, but to connect the relevance of this KB in supporting SL toward effecting change in the world as ethically determined through stakeholder engagement. As a natural result of this discussion, a cascade of more questions emerged such as, “How can we bridge the perceived gap between academic knowledge and real-world practice,” and “What are the necessary intermediary factors from insight to impact?”
Systems Landscape and Systemic SensibilitiesRay urged the team to frame the next steps of the contribution of the SRT (or rebranded as  the ‘Landscape of Systems Knowing Inquiry’) as we devised a ‘first-cut’ model (Figure 2 and Table 1) of an ‘investment portfolio’ as a device to aid on-going inquiry by us, as well as a means to organize and report on our work and that of other groups committed to supporting transitions to systemic literacy (systemic sensibility + [systems science + systems thinking in practice or STiP]) (Blackmore, C., Reynolds, M., Ison, R. & Lane, A., 2015).  We understand investment to include financial, individual, intellectual, group, organizational, philanthropic, among other characteristics or attributes, and the ‘portfolio’ to be designed drawing on concepts of self-organization, open-source protocols, and easy refinement for different purposes/investors.  As outlined earlier we identified eight elements of a possible system to enhance the quality of systems knowing, though the possible systemic relations among these eight are yet to be established, understood and articulated (e.g. there may need to be more or less). We suggest that in a 'first-cut' portfolio design each of these eight elements needs to utilize/complete the following template:• What is the element - characterize it?• Why is it important?• What is a story (narrative) or case study about it - of need, failure, success, etc.?• Suggest possible 'investment' agendas or pathways - who; how; when?Monitoring and evaluation systems against agreed, yet adaptable, measures of performance are needed ‘in service’ of moving towards systemic literacy. Controlling action will also be needed. These ‘systems’ will also require a conducive institutional/organizational platform from which to operate and thrive.Conclusions and RecommendationsThe SRT’s Conversation focused on the question, “How can Systems Research be in service to Systems Literacy?” To reiterate, discussions were coalesced into two essential aspects. First, Systems Research serves Systems Literacy by providing a credible foundation for the principles and practices of Systems Science and Systems Thinking in both systematic and systemic ways. Second, Systems Research provides an impartial, dispassionate frame for development of ethical and effective applications of those principles and practices.In the team’s view, successful programs in Systems Literacy will be grounded in Systems Research encompassing: 1.) a history of systems thinking (context, sources, and development of key ideas – principles expressed in clear language); 2.) literature of systems (a canon of essential theory, results of practice, and criticism); and 3) transdisciplinarity (shared relations and effects of systems sciences with other di…

Chairs
avatar for Mary Edson

Mary Edson

President, maredson.s3@gmail.com
Mary Edson is President of the International Federation for Systems Research.  As a Scholar/Practitioner whose major interests are in Complex Adaptive Social Systems, she teaches courses in Executive Leadership, Strategic Project Management, and Talent Management including Diversity and Inclusion. Through experiential learning and development of organizational leadership competencies, her students apply systems thinking to improve business... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 139 Engineering Building, University of Colorado

2:00pm

Anticipation and Systems Thinking: A Key to Resilient Systems
2787  Disasters often endanger the foundations of our society. Due to many factors (larger popula- tion, more dependency on more complex technology, more and greater interference in natural systems and the environment, dramatic changes in the environment, ...) the number and the severity of disasters seem to grow, additionally exaggerated by the media coverage.The ultimate aim in the case of disaster is to save as many lives as possible and also safeguard the survival of the society in total and to protect as much of the societal structure, infrastructure and environment as possible. This requires the social system to show an amount of resistance and stability with respect to an incident that can cause endangering disasters.An incident of this kind can be attributed to the interaction of three overall factors: an external or internal hazard, a vulnerability of the system and an insufficient reactive capacity of the system to shield or resist the incident.With respect to the system’s capacity two countermeasures are essential to overcome an incident of that kind: * Anticipation of the incident and as a consequence the provision of adequate preparation and * Systemic Thinking in order to understand the relationship of and cybernetic loops within the components of the affected system and the incident.Anticipation and as a consequence a timely preparation of responses to future disasters will help to avoid the worst possible consequences and improve the chances for survival. Additionally we need a better understanding of the complex relationships causing the hazard and the long-term effects of our interventions on nature, human society, and environment: Systems Thinking.In this paper we analyze the key factors potentially leading to a system disturbance: Hazard, vulnerability of the affected system and capacity of the affected system. We classify these disturbances (incident, emergency, crisis, disaster, and catastrophe) and analyze the different reactions a system can show (fragile, fault tolerant, elastic, resilient, robust, antifragile). By discussing the phases of disaster management we can identify the information required for effective Anticipation and for the identification of critical systemic relationships. Finally we analyze the phases of Disaster Management, emphasizing the need for and the application of Anticipation. We identify the source of information needed for a successful anticipatory view. As a conclusion we identify systemic problems encountered during disaster management, especially in view of anticipatory actions.

Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 1B51

2:00pm

Architecture of a Systems Modelling Platform
2845 Systems are multi-dimensional, complex and have multiple ideals. One of the biggest problems with systems is the uncertainty on where do they begin and where do they end; what is inside and what is outside. This is because what is perceived to be the system is an approximation of the real system. It is possible to learn about the real system incrementally and improve the approximate system or system-in-focus; as the gap between the approximate and the real system is the source of the feedback and the basis for the incremental understanding. One iteration of understanding the real system could be identifying interesting properties, cognizing interesting insights based on these properties and creating models that capture this information. In the world of systems, an iterative approach to incrementally obtain understanding involves successively spanning many dimensions of the system and adopting a holistic attitude with regard to it. Holism spans multiple dimensions and is based on independence. Traditionally, system thinkers adopt an array of modelling approaches (influence diagrams, system dynamics models, viable system models, living systems models and so on) to develop an understanding of the system. In order to create a holistic view of the system, multiple models are collated, with each model defining a set of properties corresponding to the respective concerns. The different models allow system thinkers to look at the system at different levels of detail. They can be used to structure, identify, analyse and synthesize systems wherein each model commutes with the systems and relates to it. Each model is understood, worked upon and then composed keeping in mind the constraints of the system and the conditions in which the system exists. They can be either independent or dependant and dynamic. Each model is a different perspective in representing the system and if semantically motivated explains how the system is understood, analysed and synthesized. In this paper, the architecture of a modelling platform that provides the ability to model different aspects of the system is discussed. The objective of this platform is to support modelling as a capability so that a holistic understanding of the system can be developed. The focus is on those models and modelling approaches that can be supported by information systems in the form of tools. The discussion in this paper also stems around a unified model of the system which is constructed by taking into account the different perspectives obtained by modelling the system using different approaches. The instantiation of the architecture to realize a platform for modelling systems is presented. Keywords – Systems, Models, Multi-Models, Holism, Modelling Platform, Modelling Approaches.

Chairs
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.

Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 265

2:00pm

New Strategies for the Mexican Petrochemical Industry
2808 It is necessary to define new strategies for achieving a proper growing and development of the Mexican Petrochemical Industry. As each product can be used as a final product or as raw material the influence of its production is remarkable all over the national production chains. Petrochemicals in Mexico have been classified as basic and secondary ones, by political reasons. These two groups allowed governmental institutions to regulate private activity versus public activity in this sector. At the beginning, the first group was devoted to the first chemical transformation and the secondary one to subsequent transformations. For last 30 years, petrochemical industry has not been developed as the Mexican people wanted. The trends showed that total production has remained at the same level, many installations were left out of service and imports grow very fast. The official explanations to justify the present situation of Mexican Petrochemical industry are diverse : low investments, reduced scale sizes of plants and uncertainty in government rules for new investors and for gas price as a raw material. These are the main reasons which explain the lack of competitiveness in the global market That is why this paper focuses the strategic problem of how to rescue this industry and how to promote a new outline for achieving the desired development. Key words petrochemical chains, strategies , regulation, industry.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 151

2:00pm

Taking Advantage of Systems Thinking to Improve a STEM Project to Promote Regional Development
2748 Taking Advantage of Systems Thinking to Improve a Stem Project to Promote Regional Development Luis Arturo Pinzon-Salcedo, Erika Van den Bergue Patiño & Angélica María Castaño-Herrera Email address: lpinzon@uniandes.edu.co, e.van10@uniandes.edu.co, am.castano263@uniandes.edu.co Between 2014 and 2016, a group of researchers from three different universities and a social innovation park, developed a STEM Project to promote regional development in three areas from the province of Cundinamarca, Colombia. The project was financed with public funds and supported the official regional plans. The intervention was carried out by a group of almost thirty researchers using several systemic and non-systemic approaches. The involvement of researchers from diverse disciplines who believed in very different paradigms, as well as the participation of communities with dissimilar interests and problems, posed serious challenges to the project. During the research inquiry the participants experienced the difficulty of integrating elements from apparently incommensurable paradigms from the social sciences, the natural sciences, and several engineering disciplines. This experience, as well as others that involved the promotion of regional development by taking advantage of the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, served to propose a systemic model of intervention that we consider might be helpful in developing future STEM projects to promote regional development. The aforementioned intervention drew upon several systems thinking principles, methodologies and techniques, such as boundary critique, soft systems methodologies, critical systems heuristics, Midgley’s creative design of methods, and system dynamics. The model proposed for new regional STEM interventions takes advantage of several systemic methodologies, principles and techniques, and proposes a new multi-paradigm multimethodolgy that aims an improving the efficacy and effectiveness of regional interventions. The model includes several key elements that we consider particularly relevant: the promotion of community capacity to guarantee a sustainable future, community development at different levels (cultural, social, economic, etc.), training that involves both individual and social learning, and continuous evaluation. This paper also illustrates the important role that computer supported collaborative learning and other information and communication technologies can play in these interventions, as well as the relevance of the communities of practice theories to address diverse issues but particularly identity, power and learning issues.

Chairs
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 1B55

2:00pm

The Holistic Values of Socio-Ecological Systems and the Practice of Green Development InChina
2758 The continuous intensify of ecological crisis has aroused a strong sense of ecological protection. Since the 80s of the 20th century, a serious of movement aimed at environmental protection, ecological movement, and feminism appeared in the developed countries in Western Europe. The movement which is called the Green Movement treated intellectuals and middle class as the main participants. The serious environmental problems also emerged in the process of realizing the rapid development of economy in China. Therefore, the Chinese government focus on the ideas of Green Development. The green development requires the whole society to establish a reasonable value of natural capital, to form new social and moral norms, to promote green lifestyles, and so forth. The way of China's green development has get the world's attention. From the green movement to the green development, it has formed a systems holistic values of socio-ecological system gradually. Firstly, we support the intrinsic value of natural system and oppose the traditional philosophy values which considered the tool value of nature as primary only when it is related to the subjective purpose of human beings or meets the needs of humans. Secondly, we propose that the values of natural system is holistic. The intrinsic value of natural system and the tool value can be converted to each other. As Rolston III said, the intrinsic value and the tool value would be converted among lives, species, systems and surroundings by the transformation of systems, so as to maintain the stability and integrality of systems. In socio-ecological system, the interaction between the natural values and human values and the function of each other formed the value chain of system dynamics and integrity. Thirdly, the order parameter of socio-ecological system is bearing threshold of systems, the order parameter emerged by the synergistic reaction of social system, economic system and natural system will constraint and control the collaboration optimization of each subsystem of the socio-ecological systems in turn. Modern systems science and complexity research has provided a new perspective and theoretical basis to the intrinsic value of natural systems and the holistic values of socio-ecological systems when it refers to the holistic property and emergence, adaptation and evolution, purpose and values of systems. The holistic values of socio-ecological systems pay more attention to the holistic interests of human social system, economic system and natural system. It has great significance to solve serious ecological crisis and realize sustainable futures in socio-ecological systems.

Chairs
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →

Speakers
DF

Dongping Fan

systems2016@126.com
QF

Qiang Fu

vongss@163.com


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 200

2:30pm

Developing a Systemic Framework for Evaluation Models and their Applications
2755 The following paper presents the development of a systemic framework for the classification of evaluation models, based on the reflective process that takes place when selecting an evaluation model and the study of processes of marginalization. For such purposes, several classifications proposed by various authors for systemic methodologies are taken into account. We should begin by stressing the importance of the concept of assessment or evaluation as it allows us to make judgments about the performance of organizations, projects, programs, staff and activities at different levels enabling the implementation of activities or actions to reduce the gap between the current state of a system and its desired state. These activities not only seek a gap reduction but are also oriented to process and human group sustainability through the achievement of best practices that will bring benefits in the long term. When selecting an evaluation model, the evaluator is usually based on the best-known features, such as the methods used, the research questions that it follows, and the kind of problems that could be targeted. However, as evaluation is entirely based on judgments, each assessment model necessarily has a set of underlying values that are rarely taken into account and should be aligned not only with the purpose for which the evaluation is done but also with the moral characterization of the problems it tackles. Such judgmental nature, implies that any judgment must be based on a set of guiding principles, standards or ideals that determine the position of the object evaluated with respect to such values. An individual, which in this case is the evaluator, must carry out a reflective process to establish this set of elements. For this reason, this paper describes the development of a systemic framework that seeks to classify the various models of evaluation of projects, policies and programs according to the values underlying each of them considering their deontological and methodological bases. In this paper deontology comprises the ethics and principles underlying the evaluation profession and specifically in the conducted evaluation process, while methodology is seen as the basis that validates a set of procedures and tools. For the development of this framework we took into account the framework for the classification of systemic methodologies proposed by authors such as Banathy and Burrell & Morgan, as well as the theory of “knowledge-constitutive interests” proposed by Jurgen Habermas and the context classification of a problem. The development of such a classification allows the individual that is conducting the evaluation to be able to select an appropriate and accurate methodology in accordance with the purpose for which the assessment will be carried out.

Chairs
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 1B55

2:30pm

Framing a System
2862 Boundaries of a system are largely determined by human perception. As a result, the boundaries are to an extent arbitrary but to an extent created in response to changing environmental conditions. Given this dynamic, the way a system is framed in terms of its boundaries affects human action on a global scale. Understanding this framing can empower the human agent and enable a recontextualization of human potential such that our planetary system is approached and maintained in an ecologically equitable and sustainable fashion. This paper outlines how such framing relates to different scales of human civilization and what some of the important practical distinctions are related to such an act of framing.

Chairs
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 200

2:30pm

On the Information Processing Aspect of the Evolutionary Process
2853   On the Information Processing Aspect of the Evolutionary Process 

Chairs
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.

Monday July 25, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 265

2:30pm

Sustainability Challenged – Comparing Two Competing Value Systems – What We Found “Shang Jun Shu (The Book By Shang)” From Chin’ Dynasty 2000 Years Ago and the Islamist Ideology Today in Common
2790 Sustainability of this civilization is only a wishful thinking without frank analysis of, followed by strategic plans to deal with, the competing value systems currently playing on the stage of the international politics. High profile keywords here are refuges, terrorism, China Threat, globalization, and “conflict of civilization” (even we do not quite agree with the term in Huntington’s original sense). Among the major competitors with our current mainstream value system are Chinmunism (Hu, 2010), i.e. the so-called Chinese way of order (including social order, state order and world order, with cultural genes traceable back to Chin’ Dynasty 2000 years ago and to Communist movement from 1917 to 1990), and the Islamist Ideology or Islam fundamentalism (e.g. Goldberg, 2015) that becomes a high profile issue in media and our lives for obvious reasons. A guestimated of 50%+ of Chinese-speaking people (700 million) might support a Chinmunistic world view, and in at least 25 countries that 50%+ of Muslims prefer the Sharia Law to be the law of their land (PEW Research, 2013). The authors have noted, among many differences of the text and the context of the two sets of ideas and values, i.e. one sets up of the ruling paradigm for China in 2000 years, and another defines a desirable world of “Umma”, there is an interesting commonality between them: They all aimed at reducing the diversity, complexity, and the degree of freedom of the society they take control, an interesting case for Ashby’s Law of Requisite Variety. This paper compares the similarities and differences of these two value systems to facilitate the readers to draw their own conclusions and decide for their own actions.

Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

Monday July 25, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 1B51

2:30pm

Using Viable System Model for Chinese Outbound Tourist Market Sustainability
2832 Tourism industry benefited worldwide economy providing services to Chinese Tourists who traveled to foreign in 2014 generating income by 165 billion dollars and accounting for 13% of international tourism. Realizing this market’s acquisition means growth opportunities for destinations; as well as the added difficulty in services nature of being unsteady, improvable and involving many factors. This article reaches the assembling of chinese outbound tourism market sustainability through the premise of a different perspective for conceptualizing, designing and delivering tourism services as part of a whole socio-ecological system; and sets out a reflection on sustainable responses to some emergencies derived from the increasing tourist activity of the chinese outbound market system. As examples of a problematic situation are augmenting infrastructure demand, transport and public services in peak season that exceeding load capacity generates negative results for residents and tourists; repercussions on wildlife by large tourist flows during critical moments of migration, breeding or rearing; impacts on local cultures due to the encounter between contrasting lifestyles. Therefore, the opportunity to expand choices grounded on the convenience of systemic approach for sustainable tourism study and decision-making. The outcome is the Chinese Outbound Market System diagnosis and teleology, the determination of recursive levels, interrelations and conflicts; as well as the systemic integration between it’s elements using Viable System Model to configure a holistic construct composed of relevant subsystems oriented to viability and sustainability. It is concluded that tourism planning that omits sustainable character, reduces social benefits severely with consequences not only ecologically harmful, but also economically self-destructive. In that way it could be possible to confront currently systemic socio-ecological issues. Keywords: Sustainability System, Emergence, VSM, Chinese Outbound Tourism Market

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 151

3:00pm

Afternoon Break
Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
ECCR Lobby Engineering Building, University of Colorado

3:30pm

A Systemic Approach on Human Resource Management in Tourism Small and Medium Enterprises Considering Socio-Ecological Systems
2834 The context in which Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) of lodging carry out their operations is turbulent. This Human Activity Systems (HAS) develop certain practices that threaten aspects such as internal equilibrium, resilience, their relation with natural environment and hence its permanence in the sector. The purpose of this paper is to present the basis for an autopoietic management system of human resources within mexican tourist SMEs in order to generate self-organization and adaptation considering social and natural dimensions. The methodological approach is carried out using the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) looking to reduce problematic situations generated for whom manage the systems as well as those related to the human resource management. With respect to the findings, a conceptual model was designed consisting of subsystems that consider heterogenity in tourist SMEs and human resource management problems, in that sense is intended to regulate its complexity and maintain an equilibrium with the environment. It is considered that actors with managerial functions may benefit from a holistic approach that looks for the transcendence of the whole system in its current context. Keywords: Soft Systems Methodology, Tourism, SMEs, Human Resources Management.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 151

3:30pm

Emerging Possibilities: Adapting Carol Sanford’s Stakeholder Pentad for the Nonprofit and Public Sectors
2767 The nonprofit and public sectors are constantly challenged to create greater impact with fewer and fewer resources. The recession of 2008 has resulted in less funding for both sectors and increased demand for their programs and services, pushing many organizations to the brink. With the likelihood of change in the current state slim, nonprofits and public agencies are eager for new approaches that will enable them to create greater value from existing resources in a socially responsible manner. This paper introduces one possible tool, which was adapted from Carol Sanford’s stakeholder pentad introduced in her book, The Responsible Business: Reimagining Sustainability and Success. Sanford’s pentad is intended to shift a business’s focus away from measuring success based purely on financial returns to one of a quintuple bottom line centered on developing relationships with the following five sets of stakeholders: customers, co-creators, earth, community, and investors. The pentad for the nonprofit and public sectors includes a slightly different set of stakeholders: beneficiaries, co-creators, earth/humanity, community, and investors/funders. Beneficiaries are those for whom programs and services are provided. Co-creators are those with whom non-profits and agencies partner and may include volunteers, staff, partnering organizations, and other stakeholders. Earth/humanity is the pentad point of the global, long-term perspective and is based in relationship to earth and to humanity. The community point in the pentad refers to how an organization’s actions impact the community, and the local perspective and social context in which they operate. The investors and funders for nonprofits and public agencies are local, state, and federal funders, taxpayers, donors, foundations, and board members, without whom these organizations could not realize their visions. Attention to these five stakeholder groups creates a strong sense of resilience in the organization’s community. A case example of how to apply the nonprofit and public sectors pentad to an existing organization is outlined in this paper. It is described through Sanford’s four phases for reconstructing an organization already steeped in its processes and culture. These four phases are (1) cultural evolution, (2) strategic direction, (3) capacity building, and (4) work redesign. This approach will enable nonprofits and public agencies to thrive in the face of scarcity and high demand. Keywords: Carol Sanford; stakeholders; stakeholder engagement; nonprofit sector; public sector; living systems; sustainability; resilience; cultural evolution; strategic direction; capacity building; work redesign; critical systemic thinking; human service organizations  

Chairs
DF

Dennis Finlayson

Retired, dennisfinlayson56@yahoo.com
ISSS Retired

Speakers
avatar for Marty Jacobs

Marty Jacobs

PhD Student, Saybrook University
I am currently enrolled at Saybrook University pursuing a doctorate in Organizational Systems. My research interests are in the areas of multi-sector transformational change, complex adaptive systems, systems sciences, and Dialogic OD. A goal I have during the program is to develop a leadership guide for multi-sector transformational change.Prior to enrolling at Saybrook, I ran my own consulting business for 11 years, where I provided strategic... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 265

3:30pm

Exploring the Phenomenon of Technological Integration in K-12 Classrooms for Education Leaders
2796 Throughout the years, there has been a concern about how the school systems in the United States can be improved. As population growth continues and existing issues remain due to a insufficient funding, it becomes more complex to address the specific areas where training is needed, students with special needs are forgotten, growing classroom sizes, parent involvement student health and more. The current issue we can see now is the lack of resources schools have to spend on research and development. By utilizing technology to conduct the research and collect data, it may be possible to optimize resources of faculty and improve student learning. Similar to any change in organizations, there will be resistance among not only the faculty, but also the parents and students whose cooperation and belief in the technology is needed. The presentation will build upon the ideas that success in implementing technology into classrooms relies heavily on collaborative teamwork from educators and education leaders, an established digital platform as a tool to keep all team members in constant communication and in sync, and well as trust in the relationships between the technology, the user, and the leaders advocating for this transition into the 21st century. Leaders who are successful should likely have less feelings of frustration, doubt, or impatience with the process. On the contrary, leaders THE PHENOMENON OF TECHNOLOGY IN K-12 CLASSROOMS 3 who have achieve levels of technology integration in their schools should feel hopeful, eager, enthusiastic, and inquisitive with their responsibilities. The analysis will be strictly K-12 focused considering that Higher Education operates significantly different than K-12 (Ensminger, 2005). The demonstration will attempt to provide insight not only on the success of what leaders have experienced through integrating technology in K-12 schools, but also some of the challenges they had encountered when working with students and parents to accept and believe in the technology they want to use. This investigation will help shed light on some of the likely obstacles and the solutions decided by these leaders in order to prepare future education leaders for the transition as more and more school board members and leaders begin to embrace technology as a positive and efficient change for their organizations

Chairs
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 245

3:30pm

The System of Accounts for Global Entropy Production, (Sage-P): Nonlinear Accounting of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) In the Domain of the Ecosphere, Sociosphere and Econosphere
2763 GDP is a linear measure at market prices of the annual production of the (final) goods and services produced in the National Economy. It is gross insofar as it excludes the degradation of the capital stock. The accounts are divided into four categories: (i) P = production/income (i.e., payments for work and/or rent from property), (ii) C = consumption/expenditure (i.e., payments for goods and services), (iii) T = trade with the-rest-of-the-word, (i,e,, payments to/from nonresident consumers/producers), and (iv) K = capital/surplus, (i.e., investment with an expected flow of future income). We shall redefine the categories of GDP as product of the Second Law of thermodynamics: (i) Production = Pe = negentropy. (ii) Ce = consumption = entropy, (iii) Te = international trade in net-valued export/import of entropy production Te = (Pe - Ce), (iv) Ke = Low Entropy Fund (LEF) available for human consumption = Ke = Pe/Ce. The three states of LEF: (a) surplus-state = Pe/Ce > 1, (b) deficit-state = Pe/Ce < 1, and (c) steady-state = Pe/Ce = 1. We shall apply the System of Accounts for Global Entropy Production (SAGE-P) in order to construct Gross Domestic Entropy Production accounts, GDPe. The first step is to calculate to LEF for the Nation x. The second step is a correspondence mapping of LEF on the four categories of GDP. The third step is to introduce the valuation method unique to the domains: (A) Ecosphere, (i.e., values conserved-in-themselves, or intrinsic, (B) Sociosphere, (i.e., values conserved-in-use, or participation) and (C) Econosphere, (i.e., values conserved-in-exchange, or market prices. A, B and C are nested sets in the form: A [B,(C)]. The fourth step is a GDP correspondence mapping of the rate of change of entropy production ∂ Pe/Ce on the value-added to the economy of primary production, (i.e., natural renewable and non-renewable resources), secondary production, (i.e., manufactured goods) and tertiary production (services). The policy objective is to minimise the rate of entropy production per unit of consumption that is: (a) feasible, (b) socio-culturally acceptable and (c) maximise the per capita human welfare.

Chairs
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →

Speakers


Monday July 25, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 200

3:30pm

Wholeness in Complex Socio-Technical Systems
2835 Highly complex social and technological systems are ubiquitous in the modern world. Many of these systems are associated with high levels of energy; potential, kinetic, and human. The consequences of system failure can be extreme. Observation of catastrophic technological failures such as two space shuttle disasters, the nuclear power plants at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and Fukushima, and many others, show clearly that creators and managers of these systems must take great care with system design and operations. Human system failures such as those seen in espionage or mass killing cases also highlight the need for both responsible and humane organizational management and sustained attention to defensive measures. Lack of attention to any of vast systemic issue both social and technical can result in organizational or defence system defects. These defects can be described as holes or shadow aspects and these pertain to the technical systems, the human systems and the socio-technical system interplay. Responsible technology and social system design requires addressing these holes and shadow aspects to eliminate them and therefore make the system complete or whole. Organizational wholeness is a continuous process of attention to and mitigation of these types of defects. Sustainability in this context is the continued focus on safe and secure operations and life affirming human dimensions to respond to environmental changes and adjust defences accordingly. This paper will describe propose a model that may be useful for hole and shadow aspect identification and issues related to their management or mitigation.

Chairs
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.

Monday July 25, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 1B51

3:30pm

Discussion: Towards Systems Literacy - The Role of Systems Research
2886 This workshop will further develop the initiatives of the Systems Research Team (SRT), which met for the second time at the 2016 IFSR Conversation in Linz, Austria. This workshop furthers the development of the SRT’s work by integrating the 2014 and 2016 teams into a collaborative cohort of researchers, scholars and practitioners in the Systems Sciences. The combined SRT consists of: Mary Edson (team leader), Pam Buckle Henning, Tim Ferris, Debora Hammond, Andreas Hieronymi, Ray Ison, John Kineman, Louis Klein, Gary Metcalf, George Mobus, Nam Nguyen, David Rousseau, Shankar Sankaran, and Will Varey with consulting team member, Peter Tuddenham. Some of the primary goals of the SRT are to educate, inform, and invite engagement by interested individuals and institutions from diverse fields and disciplines in the Systems Sciences through Systems Research and Systems Literacy. BackgroundThe two meetings of the SRT have developed two streams of value to the Systems Sciences. The first stream, started in 2014, focused on development of systems researchers and the body of knowledge. The second stream, started in 2016, focuses on role of Systems Research in the Systems Literacy Initiative. The 2014 SRT’s focus was answering the question, “What distinguishes Systems Research from other types of research,” an internal focus intended to provide grounding for researchers new to the Systems Sciences. The outcome of this phase of the SRT’s work was the publication of a book, A Guide to Systems Research: Philosophy, Processes and Practice (Springer, 2016). The 2016 SRT’s focus is on reaching out to a broader community to provide a foundation for Systems Literacy. The team’s Conversation revolved around the question, “How can Systems Research be in service to Systems Literacy?” The team’s conversations were directed into two essential aspects, separate and integrated, of this question. In one aspect, Systems Research serves Systems Literacy by providing a credible foundation for the principles and practices of Systems Science and Systems Thinking in both systematic and systemic modes. In the other aspect, Systems Research provides a neutral frame for development of ethical applications of those principles and practices. The development of Systems Research in support Systems Literacy is the ongoing collaboration of the SRT. This workshop focuses on that development.Workshop DescriptionThe workshop will be conducted in two parts. In the first part, the SRT will review and revisit the team’s work to date, creating a foundation for development during this session. Two of the three hours of this workshop will be a working session devoted to unpacking the eight critical factors identified during the 2016 IFSR Conversation. These factors will serve as a basis for a Knowledge Base (KB) and an Investment Portfolio (IP) for Systems Literacy (SL). This portion of the workshop will be guided by David Rousseau (KB) and Ray Ison (IP). A Systems Analysis, guided by George Mobus, will further define and distinguish these critical factors as part of a SR/SL KB and IP. Further details of this process are provided in the following description (see Background). In the second part (the third hour) the SRT invites students, as well as researchers and other interested participants, to join a discussion about the newly published, Guide to Systems Research (see above). In this part of the session, how Systems Research contributes to establishment of a reliable KB from which SL can create a set of foundational principles will be explored, as well as identify systemic sensibilities for a broader audience.Why: Systems Research in Service to Systems LiteracyMotivation for development of a KB through SR for SL comes from theoretical and practical sources. The SRT recognizes the exigency in development of foundational principles of Systems Science and Systems Thinking that can be effectively adopted and disseminated through Systems Literacy. The team’s narrative begins with an understanding the urgency for application of Systems Sciences and Systems Thinking to wicked problems (Malik, 2016; Churchman, 1967; Rittel, 1973) and messes (Ackoff, 1974/97). Systems Research is typically a slow generation of results; however, the body of knowledge gained through this process can be confidently used to address complexity in timely ways. The criticality of the need for salient approaches to complexity is shown in a graphic representation of some possible trajectories of applying or not applying these Systems principles in practice. The ApproachThe choice of how we respond to these issues relates to a process model that can be applied. Through understanding the relationship of the process model to the trajectory, the team directed its focus to developing a MindMap of eight essential aspects or features of how Systems Research can support Systems Literacy. These include: Systems Science knowledge base, roles and personas, maturity models, role profile, ontology/vocabulary, perspective/framing choice, frameworks, and political ecology. Each of these eight has its own process of unpacking, which was demonstrated to the Conversation participants using the knowledge base. The eight relate to unpacking the Systems landscape in a coherent but loosely coupled investment portfolio (economic, social, and relational) for building systemic sensibility in such a way as to be dis/aggregated for different audiences.  After identifying eight, critical factors or components that form the structural aspects of the process our team decided to explore these factors further. The team developed a mind map of the critical factors (or ways of knowing) and developed separate mind maps of each of the factors. These factors need further unpacking (clarification, definition, and distinction), as well as systems analysis, to refine the process model that was developed during the Conversation. The purpose of this process is not about increasing the amount of systems books and papers in the KB, but to connect the relevance of this KB in supporting SL toward effecting change in the world as ethically determined through stakeholder engagement. As a natural result of this discussion, a cascade of more questions emerged such as, “How can we bridge the perceived gap between academic knowledge and real-world practice,” and “What are the necessary intermediary factors from insight to impact?”
Systems Landscape and Systemic SensibilitiesRay urged the team to frame the next steps of the contribution of the SRT (or rebranded as  the ‘Landscape of Systems Knowing Inquiry’) as we devised a ‘first-cut’ model (Figure 2 and Table 1) of an ‘investment portfolio’ as a device to aid on-going inquiry by us, as well as a means to organize and report on our work and that of other groups committed to supporting transitions to systemic literacy (systemic sensibility + [systems science + systems thinking in practice or STiP]) (Blackmore, C., Reynolds, M., Ison, R. & Lane, A., 2015).  We understand investment to include financial, individual, intellectual, group, organizational, philanthropic, among other characteristics or attributes, and the ‘portfolio’ to be designed drawing on concepts of self-organization, open-source protocols, and easy refinement for different purposes/investors.  As outlined earlier we identified eight elements of a possible system to enhance the quality of systems knowing, though the possible systemic relations among these eight are yet to be established, understood and articulated (e.g. there may need to be more or less). We suggest that in a 'first-cut' portfolio design each of these eight elements needs to utilize/complete the following template:• What is the element - characterize it?• Why is it important?• What is a story (narrative) or case study about it - of need, failure, success, etc.?• Suggest possible 'investment' agendas or pathways - who; how; when?Monitoring and evaluation systems against agreed, yet adaptable, measures of performance are needed ‘in service’ of moving towards systemic literacy. Controlling action will also be needed. These ‘systems’ will also require a conducive institutional/organizational platform from which to operate and thrive.Conclusions and RecommendationsThe SRT’s Conversation focused on the question, “How can Systems Research be in service to Systems Literacy?” To reiterate, discussions were coalesced into two essential aspects. First, Systems Research serves Systems Literacy by providing a credible foundation for the principles and practices of Systems Science and Systems Thinking in both systematic and systemic ways. Second, Systems Research provides an impartial, dispassionate frame for development of ethical and effective applications of those principles and practices.In the team’s view, successful programs in Systems Literacy will be grounded in Systems Research encompassing: 1.) a history of systems thinking (context, sources, and development of key ideas – principles expressed in clear language); 2.) literature of systems (a canon of essential theory, results of practice, and criticism); and 3) transdisciplinarity (shared relations and effects of systems sciences with other di…

Chairs
avatar for Mary Edson

Mary Edson

President, maredson.s3@gmail.com
Mary Edson is President of the International Federation for Systems Research.  As a Scholar/Practitioner whose major interests are in Complex Adaptive Social Systems, she teaches courses in Executive Leadership, Strategic Project Management, and Talent Management including Diversity and Inclusion. Through experiential learning and development of organizational leadership competencies, her students apply systems thinking to improve business... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 139 Engineering Building, University of Colorado

4:00pm

A Systems Approach to the Development of Research Capacity: A Case Study of a Systems Practice Masters Programme
2879 This paper brings together a systems approach and an academic literacies perspective to offer a response to the problem of how to support professionals enrolled for postgraduate study in the transition to scholarly research practice. While such study presents exciting opportunities for practice-led research, there are a number of challenges for the academic staff member who supervises the research. For becoming a researcher and scholar is more than a process of bridging a gap between the world of work and academia, as these students seek to maintain their professional identities while navigating what is valued in the academy and the power relations in and between contexts. Recent approaches to research capacity development have shifted away from viewing the transition to scholarly research practice as simply a matter of transferring skills across contexts or as socialization into the valued research conventions. Rather, from an academic literacies perspective, becoming a research scholar means coming to participate in a practice characterized by particular knowledge, tools, values, behaviours, ways of using language, and power relations, some of which is tacit and some of which is explicit. From this perspective, language use such as reading and writing is central to the process of thinking, producing data, and generating new knowledge. Supporting students in this process can present a challenge to academic staff for whom, as experts, the process of doing scholarly research has become tacit. Pressure to increase graduation rates and to reduce time to completion in postgraduate programmes, has placed the role, practice and responsibility of the supervisor in facilitating the development of research practice under increased scrutiny. Many universities have intensified their efforts at supervisor and research training by creating human activity systems with purposes aligned with this goal. At the University of Cape Town where the research reported in this article is located, discipline experts have also taken the initiative to draw on language and literacy experts to support students in research writing development for the research report or dissertation. This contribution of the literacy expert has often been in the form of a course or series of lectures as a service to a programme or group of students. This paper reports on an example of the systemic collaboration, at the level of a programme, between literacy and discipline experts in the design of a dissertation process. This programme attracts students who are working full time, usually in engineering disciplines and is offered as a block release Systems Practice Masters Programme. The purpose of supervisory practice in this programme is to develop practice-led research drawing on systems theory and practice. The specific aim of the collaboration between discipline and literacy expert is to facilitate the holistic development of the reading and writing practices valued in scholarly research practice. This design incorporates the integration of activities, modelling and feedback that facilitates interaction between the conventions of the research practice, what the student brings to the practice, and the agency of the student. The systemic approach involves working together at programme level with a clear conceptual framework of academic literacies. In this paper we present the integrative design as an activity system. We present preliminary findings of our investigation of the development of students’ research writing practices and their perceptions of the dissertation preparation process. These findings are based on the analysis of student texts, focus group interviews and reflections on the impact of supervisory practice. Key words: Academic literacies; dissertation preparation; postgraduate research capacity development; practice-led research; systemic design for learning; systemic collaboration

Chairs
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 245

4:00pm

An Aggregated Qualitative Accounting Method for Developing Justified Policies
2764 “Qualitative accounting” is almost an oxymoron. The word ‘accounting’ includes the word ‘count’, and we cannot count qualities. More precisely, we cannot meaningfully add qualities to each other, a quality cannot be measured by a standard unit. Therefore, aggregating qualities for the purposes of accounting might sound like sleight of hand, or deceptive advertising. Fear not. The result will turn out to be quite robust, given a modicum of intelligence and sensitivity. The method is original and useful. The structure of the paper is given by the following sections: (1) an introduction to the topic, by looking at each word in the title, (2) we look at the UN mandate which will be used as an example to illustrate the method, (3) an explanation of the first part of method: working with the UN mandate, (4) the second part of the method: two orders of sensitivity used for reflection, and why this adds to the robustness of the method (5) broadening the conceptions underlying the method and lastly (6) uses of the method for policy. The following is the virtual address for some computer software that does the calculations for you, so that you can experiment with the parameters and indicators. The software was developed by Dolsy Smith http://gwdev-dsmith.wrlc.org:8083/gunas_test.html. The site is free to the public and is offered as an intellectual service.

Chairs
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 200

4:00pm

Leadership Practices for Thrivability of Complex Social Systems: Three Stories
2792 The authors compare three collaborative action research projects aimed at generative systems change. The goal of the article is to reflect on the dialogic methodologies they employed, the impacts and outcomes experienced by the participants as leaders and innovators of systemic change, and the evolution of the authors’ own practices as facilitators and catalysts of change. Wilson reflects on a three-year action research project in peri-urban Mexico on sustainable community development. Focusing on the emergent edge of the evolving system of local-state relationships, she recounts the changing attitudes, emotions, and behaviors of the public sector professionals and local community leaders engaged in the project. Wilson reflects on the sense of vulnerability and insecurity raised by the dialogic methodology she used, and the impact on her own practice and sense of self in the presence of these tensions. Bush explores a year of engagement within two urban systems within Asheville NC: public housing and community schools. Using distributed ethnography, he follows public housing's resident leadership’s efforts at self-organizing governance and an Ashoka Change-Maker School’s experience in spreading its educational approach. Offering propositions about leadership for resilience in urban systems, he reflects on the challenges to and evolution of self-awareness for individuals, organizations, systems, and himself as a practitioner-researcher. Walsh reflects on her praxis in regenerative development from 2006 to 2015 in the context of environmental gentrification in a neighborhood in Austin, Texas. To become an instrument of critical, creative, and collaborative change, she developed and fostered regenerative dialogue for green home repair and a community food forest. Walsh reflects on the ways this approach supported her and the residents in harnessing the generative potential of social conflict and vulnerability. The comparative analysis of the three stories concludes with propositions for leadership practices that foster thrivability in complex social systems. 1. Banzhaf, H. S., & McCormick, E. (2006). Moving Beyond Cleanup: Identifying the Crucibles of Environmental Gentrification. SSRN eLibrary. Retrieved from http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=990074 2. Harvey, D. (2008). The Right to the City. New Left Review, (53), 23–40. 3. Hazy, J. & Uhl-Bien, M. (2015). Towards operationalizing complexity leadership: How generative, administrative and community-building leadership practices enact organizational outcomes. Leadership Vol. 11(1) 79–104 DOI: 10.1177/1742715013511483 4. Snowden, David (2002). Complex Acts of Knowing: paradox and descriptive self-awareness. Journal of Knowledge Management. Volume 6 . Number 2. 2002 . pp. 100±111 DOI: 10.1108/13673270210424639 Keywords: social systems design, leadership, thrivability, urban systems, generative dialogue

Chairs
DF

Dennis Finlayson

Retired, dennisfinlayson56@yahoo.com
ISSS Retired

Monday July 25, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 265

4:00pm

Systemic Complementarity In Micro, Small and Medium Tourist Enterprises Considering the Socio-Ecological System
2837 In Mexican context, the tourism sector has prioritized the income generation, without consider social and ecological dimensions and the impact on ecosystems and social inequality. Characterizing tourist Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs), some aspects are identified such as heterogeneity, absence of international standards as well as the inability to cope the disruption of the environment. This paper proposes to implement the systemic complementarity concept as an alternative to bring closer the tourist MSMEs to the exelixis considering the socio-ecological system, in which it operates. The methodological approach is carried out through the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM), given that this methodology allows considering the subjectivity and complexity in problematic situations integrating relevant actors. Regarding the findings a conceptual model is proposed based on a associative transformation among MSMEs emphasizing the use of variety, considering its integration. Also, this model seeks to provide emergent properties to the whole system that determine internal functioning and amplify capacities to transcend in its current context. This proposal will benefit the tourist MSMEs potentializing, through their diversity, the local dynamic and the identity of the destination in consonance with the socio- ecological system. Keywords: Tourism MSMEs, complementarity, soft system methodology, emergence, socio-ecological systems.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 151

4:00pm

Value Based Architecture of Digital Product-Service Systems
2844 In this services economy, products are increasingly taken for granted and services often serve as the differentiator for businesses. Invariably, product focused businesses package services around their products and service focused businesses package products around their services. As a result, in any business offering, there is a product component as well as a significant service component. In such a scenario, the architecture of product-service systems gains significant importance. This is further prompted by the change in employment patterns, job opportunities, contribution to GDP, ownership of intellectual property and reduction in sales. Such product-service systems have benefitted immensely due to the massive pace of digitization wherein businesses are adopting digital to connect to their customers in order to bring in a difference in their offerings. As a result, the convergence of digital technologies has become the platform for businesses wherein new product-service systems are created by fusing digital and physical worlds. In this setting, it has been found that the presence of many digital technologies contributes to innovation, competitiveness and growth of a business. Gartner is of the view that the nexus of forces (Cloud, Mobile, Social, and Information) are the driving factors for businesses. TCS is of the view that the digital five forces (Cloud, Big Data, Social, Mobility, and Robotics & Artificial intelligence) are the driving factors for business. HBR is of the view that smart, connected, miniaturized devices (Internet of Things) alter the structure, competition and value offered by a business. In essence, “digital” has established itself to be a force to be reckoned with by businesses and they increasingly strive for achieving domination on “Digital product-service systems”. While there exists numerous architecture frameworks, processes and reference models for architecture of enterprises, systems, products, software and services, it is often the case that most of these artefacts are not suited for “Digital product-service systems”. This paper presents a value based approach for architecting “Digital product-service systems”. As part of this approach, six different interdependent perspectives are considered as useful for architecting the system-of-interest. These perspectives are: • Context Perspective: The context perspective aids in understanding the situation and identifying the operative context based on the cause and effect relationships that exist in the situation. This perspective aids in the problem situation formulation and its appropriate expression. • Value Perspective: This perspective aids in developing a set of value propositions that would lead to customer delight, customer satisfaction and enhanced customer experience. This perspective aids in the formulation of value proposition of the Digital product-service system. • Quality Perspective: This perspective aids in understanding the ways/means by which the benefits can be delivered. This perspective aids in the development of the concept of operations, which describes the characteristics of the offering from the viewpoint of an individual who will consume it. • Purpose Perspective: This perspective aids in defining the statement of purpose of the offering. This perspective aids in the identification of the purpose and development of the function model. • Structure Perspective: This perspective aids in defining how the different components and their interfaces are organized and composed in order to provide the necessary resources for achieving the purpose. • Process Perspective: This perspective aids in defining how the different components are utilized to enable the purpose. The process perspective ensures that the supporting capabilities are available when and where necessary. In this paper, the use of these perspectives to architect “Digital product-service systems” and its application in businesses is illustrated with a case study. Keywords – Products, Services, Digital Technologies, Product-Service Systems, Digital Product-Service Systems, Context, Value, Quality, Purpose, Structure, Process

Chairs
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.

Monday July 25, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 1B51

4:30pm

Aristotle's Four Causes and Teamwork in Corporations
2803   Aristotle's Four Causes and Teamwork in Corporations Kulak, Daryl 

Chairs
DF

Dennis Finlayson

Retired, dennisfinlayson56@yahoo.com
ISSS Retired

Monday July 25, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 265

4:30pm

Designing an Accessible Tourism Destination: The Soft System Methodology and the Triple Helix as a Theoretical and Practical Proposal
2838 Accessible tourism has its origin in the 90´s, at the beginning it was proposed as part of the Social Tourism or Tourism for All programs that had their basis in the human rights. Later, with the changes in the paradigms about people with disabilities accessible tourism has not only become a matter of human rights but also an opportunity to develop business that satisfy a growing population of people with disabilities and older people that acquires one or more types of disabilities. Demographic factors such as the increasing in life expectancy, better health care and retirement of people increase the needs of designing and building products and services that satisfy this demand. The Soft System Methodology, developed by Peter Checkland consider social factors and complex relations in tourism, its 7 phases allow the researcher to compare and simulate different scenarios that brings to the most viable practice, it brings an approximation to a model of accessible tourism, gathering elements such as research, infrastructure needs, human resources and labour market, communications, signalling, and other things that should be considered in a competitive destination. The Triple Helix, as a theoretical and practical model allow the three main sectors, Academy, Government and Industry to join efforts to strengthen the tourism industry. The Triple Helix from Etzkowitz and Leydesdorff show that innovation can have its origins in the academy, considering that knowledge is the most valuable element nowadays in the innovation policies around the word. The Triple Helix propose that academy should work with the research and design of products and services, the government, as the policy maker should provide elements that enable academy and the industry to work together in the incorporation of research, development of products and services and funding projects. This model, designed from the Soft System Methodology considering the Triple Helix as the basis of the tourism offer propose a better way of building policies, products and services for people with disabilities and senior adults, making more competitive the destinations and it can be considered not only for this population, research has shown that accessible destinations are conceived as better places for all people because its conditions allow tourists to walk along, drive, take a bus in an easier way.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 151

4:30pm

Indigenous Contributions to Sustainability and Systems Education
2775 The denigration of the world’s ecosystems has been driven by the economic imperatives of insatiable multi-national corporations whose goals are to concentrate the ownership and control of global resources in a progressively narrowing band of society. The impacts of this denigration are understood as crises called, ozone depletion, global warming, sea-level rise, extreme weather events, water scarcity, and the shrinking polar ice regions. These challenges involve significant degrees of complexity in our rapidly changing world. Engaging societies and communities in the meaningful changes of behaviour necessary to halt and reverse the denigration of our life-supporting ecosystems is extremely difficult, given that the majority of these societies are a significant part of the problem. They rely almost universally on the same epistemological basis of understanding the world as the multi-national corporations that are destroying it. In many ways, these societies support the behaviours of the multi-national corporations through their consumerism and political systems of representation. Decision making frameworks based on systems thinking can facilitate enhanced understandings of sustainability and potentially enlighten societies to behave differently. However to do so they must communicate an understanding of complexity that engages society at the level of values and beliefs, as these determine actions. They must also be transparent, inclusive, contextually relevant, and based on epistemological concepts that are much more strongly aligned with sustainability. The epistemologies of Indigenous Peoples are based on principles of interconnectedness, holism, relevance over long periods of time, inter-generational equity, and uniqueness to place. Indigenous Peoples have out of necessity had to develop ways of retaining their values and beliefs while accommodating the enforced changes associated with the destructive colonisation processes experienced in many parts of the world. The Waitangi Tribunal was born of the first recognition of New Zealand’s 1840 founding document in the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975. This tribunal was established to avoid further transgressions of the Treaty. Many early claims were about environmental degradation while others related to the retention of cultural values, knowledge and language. Claims all identified impacts upon mauri, life supporting capacity. Indigenous concepts raised in hearings included; retention of intrinsic values / mauri; spiritual and cultural values; obligations to enhance mauri; and implications for future generations. Often successful, these claims resulted in significant rethinking of projects and ultimately informed changes in law. The Resource Management Act (1991) has the purpose of promoting sustainable development taking into account environmental, social, cultural and economic well-being of society. However while the ground-breaking new law incorporated numerous indigenous concepts, it stopped short of actually including mauri. The Mauri Model Decision Making Framework allows Indigenous Peoples to contribute understanding based on their own knowledge so that they can be effectively included in resource management decision making processes. The Framework adds a strengthened decision making context due to its ability to incorporate culturally relevant knowledge seamlessly alongside scientific understandings of a situation, incorporating both quantitative and qualitative data consistently into the same assessment. When mauri is defined as the life supporting capacity of the air, water and soil the theoretical basis is created for relevance in terms of New Zealand law, and a means to measure and evaluate impacts in a holistic way then exists. Thus through integrating systems techniques and the indigenous concept, Mauri, the Mauri Model Decision Making Framework creates a new approach to cross-cultural communication and action. Independent research has assessed the Mauri Model as an exemplar against Bellagio STAMP and it is now included in curricula in engineering, planning and international studies at the University of Auckland, as well as being an online resource.

Chairs
avatar for Ockie Bosch

Ockie Bosch

President Elect, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare Research. In 2000 he was offered a position as Professor in Natural Systems Management at the University of Queensland in Australia. In 2012 he moved to the... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 245

4:30pm

Performance Evaluation System In Engineering Matters: Systematic and Theoretical Approach to Humanity
2742 As systematic approach to engineering matters, the performance evaluation system is proposed and examined theoretically by using mathematical model. The systematic and theoretical approach to humanity is described. In the long history of human activity, engineering, culture, tradition, customs, life style, language have been formed gradually based upon politics, economics, natural and social environments. In usual, facility (F) behaves and performs a certain interaction (I) under some environments (E). This general phenomenon (physics/chemistry) is due to nature laws and also applies to a general social phenomenon and human activity. Above F,E,I are considered to be primary elements of basic system V(F,E,I).The performance of V(F,E,I) is evaluated as a result of phenomenon. As rating index (p), five elements are defined: time(t), space(x),money(m), humanity(h), quality(q). Basic system V(F,E,I) is expressed in form of V(t,x,m,h,q) because of having rating index built-in. Performance evaluation system is formulated by mathematical model (partial differentiation form )of δV(F,E,I)/ δp. Primarily, it is revised to organize the basic system V(F,E,I) ,then build each hierarchy in detail, integrating independent phenomenon. 1)Partial cause /effect analysis : δV(F,E,I)/ δp= δV1(F)/ δp+ δV2(E)/ δp+ δV3(I)/ δp . 2)Primary evaluation: δV/δp (gradient/grade), quick/slow (t), large/small (x), tough/fragile, strong/weak (q), beautiful/dirty, bright/dark (h), expensive/cheap, rich/poor (m). 3)Secondary evaluation:δ2V/δp2 (acceleration/inertia/potential), life evaluation (t), spread characteristics, broad spectrum evaluation (x), safety, reliability evaluation (q), public opinion, reputation, use-related evaluation (h), money making characteristics, economic evaluation(m). 4)Multifarious evaluation δ2V/δp1δp2: System V is revised from different viewpoints.             δ2V/δmδt: change of stock prices. δ2V/δhδt: reputational future risk in time history. 5)Sequence order of evaluation time: The decision making is handled depending on a situation to develop one by one. The conclusion highly depends on time processing.  6)System V is classified to be function separated type and function integrated type, which results in big influence on performance evaluation in decision making(δ2V/δp1δp2 type). As the two-dimensional(X,Y)problem, the expression method of block diagram is discussed. It should be orthogonally designated by independent phenomenon each other. In X-Y axis, time(t),space(x), money(m),humanity(h),quality/quantity(q) are usually chosen as the rating index which are mutually exclusive and independent phenomenon each other. As a model, a risk diagram (occurrence probability-hazard relation) is used. In which for X-Y axis, rating index m/t are orthogonally designated. Furthermore, division of risk category A,B,C,D are made as risk matrix and used for risk management/control. The shape of this block domain highly depends on nature law (probability density function). The shape factor k has some properties: 1) k>1,too active/top heavy type,2) k=1, stable/natural type,3) k

Chairs
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.

Monday July 25, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 1B51

4:30pm

The Reconstruction of Systems Paradigm: Study on the Idea and Model for Boundary-Balance of Nonlinear Society
2770 The development of contemporary China is in a unique complex situation which refers to a nonlinear system situation stems from the complex interactions among elements, structure, function and environment of Chinese social system. One of important features of this complex situation is the unpredictability of system evolution at the edge of chaos. One fundamental dilemma for Chinese social system in transition is how to build a paradigm to adapt to this complex situation.While the endeavors to transplant “linear ideal model”from Western society failed, and the “Simple Science Paradigm”which once dominated Chinese society is deep in crisis now. The serious environmental problems derived from these endeavors force China to build a new approach related to green development. As one of important thought sources to build the paradigm to adapt to this complex situation, process philosophy provides us with enlightening thinking tools. First, ontologically speaking, process philosophy help us to understand interactions between human activity systems and natural systems from the perspective of time-space-matter relationship. Second, epistemologically speaking, process philosophy emphasizes the construction of “organism” knowledge at the level of life community. Third, methodologically speaking, process philosophy attempts to rebuild a co-existence relationship between human activity systems and natural systems with the “prehension” methodology. We believe that the critical steps for solving the fundamental dilemma for the development of contemporary China include--focus on the deep contradictions between current economic development and environmental protection, taking process philosophy as one of important thought sources, based on modern systems science and complexity research, popularizing the new idea of Eco-society, rebuilding a paradigm for social system with the characteristic of the continuous emergence of sustainability, and promoting the continuous evolution of this paradigm in practice.

Chairs
avatar for Stefan Blachfellner

Stefan Blachfellner

Managing Director, stefan.blachfellner@bcsss.org
SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems | | Stefan Blachfellner is the Managing Director of the Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science (BCSSS) in Vienna, a Vice President of the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), and the Conference Manager for the European Meetings on Cybernetics and Systems Research (EMCSR). He chairs the Special Integration Group on Socio-Ecological Systems and Design in the International Society... Read More →

Monday July 25, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 200

5:30pm

Refresh and Dinner
Please find attached an Area Restaurant List which details:


  • opening hours

  • location

  • and phone numbers.


We hope that you enjoy Boulder's eateries!
 

Sponsors & Partners
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Monday July 25, 2016 5:30pm - 6:45pm
Own Choice See attached PDF

7:00pm

Special Evening Program: Next Steps to Realizing a Sustainable Future
As we reach global limits of human growth in many dimensions, advanced thinking is required to operate in ecological balance with nature and to create more symbiotic opportunities. Join us for an informative evening of public talks on anticipating the future of nature and humanity.

Chairs
avatar for Amy Lewis

Amy Lewis

Director of Partnerships Development, The WILD Foundation
Amy Lewis is a positive personality with a high capacity for creative organizational problem solving. She is a fundraiser, policy analyst, and nonprofit management professional, and brings a fresh perspective and loads of initiative to all of her endeavors. Beginning with revamping volunteer recruitment processes at Teaming For Technology, doubling the number of volunteers available to Denver nonprofits, and culminating with program... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for William S. Becker

William S. Becker

Executive Director, Presidential Climate Action Project (PCAP)
William Becker, 62, is Executive Director of the Presidential Climate Action Project (PCAP), which has created a comprehensive plan for the next President of the United States to jump-start federal leadership on global warming during his first 100 days in office. PCAP, delivered to the Obama Transition Team in November 2008, has been called the Gold Standard of policy guidance for the incoming President.Bill also directs two dynamic projects that... Read More →
avatar for Marc Beckoff

Marc Beckoff

Professor Emeritus, University of Colorado
Marc Bekoff is a former Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and is a Fellow of the Animal Behavior Society and a past Guggenheim Fellow. In 2000 he was awarded the Exemplar Award from the Animal Behavior Society for major long-term contributions to the field of animal behavior. Marc is also an ambassador for Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots program, in which he works with students of all ages, senior... Read More →
avatar for John Fullerton

John Fullerton

Founder and President, The Capital Institute
John Fullerton is the Founder and President of Capital Institute, “a collaborative working to explore and effect the economic transition to a more just, regenerative, and thus sustainable way of living on this earth through the transformation of finance.” Through the work of Capital Institute, regular public speaking engagements, and university lectures, John has become a recognized thought leader in the New Economy space generally, and the... Read More →
avatar for Ilarion Merculieff

Ilarion Merculieff

Advocate for Indigenous Rights/Wisdom
Larry Merculieff has almost four decades of experience serving his people, the Aleuts of the Pribilof Islands and other indigenous peoples in a number of capacities—locally, statewide, nationally and internationally. For his entire career, Merculieff has been a passionate advocate for indigenous rights/wisdom, and harmonious relationship with the Earth Mother. His reach has been broad and varied.
avatar for Jeff Orolowski

Jeff Orolowski

Director, Producer and Cinematographer on the Sundance Award-Winning film, Chasing Ice, ExposureLabs / Founder
Filmmaker Jeff Orlowski most recently served as director, producer, and cinematographer on the Sundance Award-Winning film, Chasing Ice. Orlowski’s feature length documentary was invited to screen at the White House, the United Nations and the United States Congress and has captured over 30 awards from film festivals around the world. It went on to receive an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song, and has screened on all... Read More →
avatar for Gunter Pauli

Gunter Pauli

Director and Chief Technology Officer, Blue Economy Holdings, Inc.
Gunter Pauli (1956) graduated as an economist with an MBA ant then established ten companies of which two failed. He has never had a job and has always worked independently. Inspired by Aurelio Peccei, the founder of the Club of Rome, he set out to pioneer and be the change he wanted to see in the world. His endeavors cover business, culture, science and education. He co-authored a book with Fritjof Capra that was the first book ever presented on... Read More →
avatar for Joshua Tewksbury

Joshua Tewksbury

Global Hub Director, Colorado, Future Earth
Josh is an ecologist, conservation biologist, and planetary health scientist with experience both in academia and in civil society. Before joining Future Earth as the Director of the Colorado Global Hub, Josh was the Maggie and Doug Walker Endowed Professor of Natural History at the University of Washington, with appointments both in the department of Biology and the College of the Environment, where his work focused on major global change... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences
avatar for WILD Foundation

WILD Foundation

The Wild Foundation



Monday July 25, 2016 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Macky Auditorium (CU campus) 1595 Pleasant St, Boulder, CO
 
Tuesday, July 26
 

7:00am

Breakfast
C4C Meal Cards

Sponsors & Partners
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences



Tuesday July 26, 2016 7:00am - 8:30am
Centre for Community Dining Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

7:15am

ISSS2016 Roundtable Reflection
Limited Capacity seats available

Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences



Tuesday July 26, 2016 7:15am - 8:15am
Centre for Community (C4C) TreeHouse Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

8:29am

Plenary III: Connecting Human and Natural System(s) Research
Description. Current ecological trends present a dramatic picture of potentially catastrophic change in the world. At the same time, our human and societal response mechanisms seem poorly designed for coping with complexity, and science seems unable to address systemic problems and systems as a whole. What are the challenges in science, policy, and ethics to become a sustainably healthy civilization with creative options for the future? [Chair: Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey]

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Tewksbury

Joshua Tewksbury

Global Hub Director, Colorado, Future Earth
Josh is an ecologist, conservation biologist, and planetary health scientist with experience both in academia and in civil society. Before joining Future Earth as the Director of the Colorado Global Hub, Josh was the Maggie and Doug Walker Endowed Professor of Natural History at the University of Washington, with appointments both in the department of Biology and the College of the Environment, where his work focused on major global change... Read More →
avatar for Carol Wessman

Carol Wessman

Professor and Director of the CIRES Ecosystem Sciences Division and CU Boulder Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado, CIRES
Ecosystem ecology, landscape ecology, regional and global biogeochemical cycling, ecological applications of remote sensing and geographic information systems. Current research includes studies of ecosystem controls over biophysical fluxes (CO2, water and energy) within global grasslands and semiarid lands utilizing remotely sensed spectral data in conjunction with simulation models; scaling site-level ecology to landscape and regional scales... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 8:29am - 8:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

8:30am

Carol Wessman (ENVS/CIRES): Linking Science, Policy, and Ethics in Sustainability Science at the University of Colorado
Chairs
avatar for Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey

Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey

Ph.D. Student / Instructor, University of Colorado, Environmental Studies Program
Jeremiah is a PhD student interested in the intersection of science and policy and how science is used in the policy-making process. His current research focuses on understanding the evolution of learning networks as they build resilience (social and ecological). His is currently working with the Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network (FAC Net) and the Locally Managed Marine Area (LMMA) Network of the Indo-Pacific. Jeremiah’s interests are... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Carol Wessman

Carol Wessman

Professor and Director of the CIRES Ecosystem Sciences Division and CU Boulder Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado, CIRES
Ecosystem ecology, landscape ecology, regional and global biogeochemical cycling, ecological applications of remote sensing and geographic information systems. Current research includes studies of ecosystem controls over biophysical fluxes (CO2, water and energy) within global grasslands and semiarid lands utilizing remotely sensed spectral data in conjunction with simulation models; scaling site-level ecology to landscape and regional scales... Read More →

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences



Tuesday July 26, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:00am

Bruce Milne: Sustainability Science
Chairs
avatar for Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey

Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey

Ph.D. Student / Instructor, University of Colorado, Environmental Studies Program
Jeremiah is a PhD student interested in the intersection of science and policy and how science is used in the policy-making process. His current research focuses on understanding the evolution of learning networks as they build resilience (social and ecological). His is currently working with the Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network (FAC Net) and the Locally Managed Marine Area (LMMA) Network of the Indo-Pacific. Jeremiah’s interests are... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:30am

Joshua Tewksbury: Living in the Anthropocene: Science, Sustainability, and Society
Chairs
avatar for Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey

Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey

Ph.D. Student / Instructor, University of Colorado, Environmental Studies Program
Jeremiah is a PhD student interested in the intersection of science and policy and how science is used in the policy-making process. His current research focuses on understanding the evolution of learning networks as they build resilience (social and ecological). His is currently working with the Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network (FAC Net) and the Locally Managed Marine Area (LMMA) Network of the Indo-Pacific. Jeremiah’s interests are... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Tewksbury

Joshua Tewksbury

Global Hub Director, Colorado, Future Earth
Josh is an ecologist, conservation biologist, and planetary health scientist with experience both in academia and in civil society. Before joining Future Earth as the Director of the Colorado Global Hub, Josh was the Maggie and Doug Walker Endowed Professor of Natural History at the University of Washington, with appointments both in the department of Biology and the College of the Environment, where his work focused on major global change... Read More →

Sponsors & Partners
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International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:30am - 10:00am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:00am

Plenary III: Q & A
Chairs
avatar for Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey

Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey

Ph.D. Student / Instructor, University of Colorado, Environmental Studies Program
Jeremiah is a PhD student interested in the intersection of science and policy and how science is used in the policy-making process. His current research focuses on understanding the evolution of learning networks as they build resilience (social and ecological). His is currently working with the Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network (FAC Net) and the Locally Managed Marine Area (LMMA) Network of the Indo-Pacific. Jeremiah’s interests are... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:00am - 10:15am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:15am

Morning Break
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International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:15am - 10:30am
MATH Courtyard Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:29am

Plenary IV: Crisis Science; Anticipatory, Real-Time, and Preventive
Description: Adequate resilience and appropriate response (interventions)  to crises and disasters and continuous improvement thereof is a growing global need and a social responsibility in view of the seemingly growing number of disasters endangering a growing number of people and even our civilization. Can we do a better job of anticipating, systemically  understanding and mitigating the   cycles of crisis and recovery   by combining exploratory ‘crisis science’ with long-term ‘sustainability science’? Can we unravel the antithesis of incompatible response systems and find new ways to integrate scientific, technological, cultural,  ethical, political and  economic influences? Preparedness must systemically consider the  often emergent interplay of supporting and obstructing factors.   Actual interventions (responses)  must holistically evaluate the total situation and make decisions, unfortunately to be performed under high uncertainty, extreme  stress and time pressure. Despite the often singularity of disasters we have to identify similarities and powerful abstraction in order to support scientific analysis and improved mitigation. A long range target could be an interdisciplinary ‘Strategic Crisis Science’.

The panel of international experts will discuss these issues from their different backgrounds and national priorities with respect to preparedness and interventions.  We will attempt to esablish common grounds and basic solutions.

Chair: Gerhard Chroust

Speakers
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.
avatar for Rick Dove

Rick Dove

Paradigm Shift International, Inc. and Stevens Institute of Technology
Rick Dove is a leading researcher, practitioner, and educator of fundamental principles for agile enterprise, agile systems, and agile development processes. In 1991 he initiated the global interest in agility as co-PI on the seminal 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy project at Lehigh University. Subsequently he organized and led collaborative research at the DARPA-funded Agility Forum, involving 250 organizations and 1000... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Maraboy

Nancy Maraboy

President and Founder, Indigenous Education Institute
Nancy C. Maryboy, Ph.D. is the President and Founder of the Indigenous Education Institute, a non profit organization with a mission of preserving, protecting and applying indigenous knowledge. She is also President of Wohali Productions, Inc., consulting in areas of indigenous science, indigenous astronomy, Native American education, curriculum development, film making and strategic planning.
avatar for Roberto Poli

Roberto Poli

UNESCO Chair in Anticipatory Systems, University of Trento / UNESCO Project Anticipation
Roberto Poli is Associate Professor of Philosophy of Science at the University of Trento (Italy). He graduated in Sociology (B.A., with honors) at the University of Trento (Italy) in 1980 and obtained a Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Utrecht (Netherlands) in 2001. | Poli has been awarded the first UNESCO Chair in Anticipatory Systems, is fellow of WAAS—World Academy of Art and Science and STIAS—Stellenbosch Institute for... Read More →
avatar for Jai (James) Syvitski

Jai (James) Syvitski

Professor / Director, International Geosphere-Biosphere Program, University of Colorado, INSTAAR
Professor James “Jai” Syvitski received doctorate degrees (Oceanography & Geological Science) from the University of British Columbia in 1978, where he developed a quantitative understanding of particle dynamics across the land-sea boundary. He held a variety of appointments within Canadian universities (1978-1995: U. Calgary, Dalhousie U., U. Laval, Memorial U., and INRS-oceanologie) and was a Senior Research Scientist within the... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:29am - 10:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:30am

Gerhard Chroust: Expecting the Unexpected, Coping with Crisis
Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:30am - 10:40am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:40am

Roberto Poli: Anticipatory Science – Science before the crisis
Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

Speakers
avatar for Roberto Poli

Roberto Poli

UNESCO Chair in Anticipatory Systems, University of Trento / UNESCO Project Anticipation
Roberto Poli is Associate Professor of Philosophy of Science at the University of Trento (Italy). He graduated in Sociology (B.A., with honors) at the University of Trento (Italy) in 1980 and obtained a Ph.D. in Philosophy at the University of Utrecht (Netherlands) in 2001. | Poli has been awarded the first UNESCO Chair in Anticipatory Systems, is fellow of WAAS—World Academy of Art and Science and STIAS—Stellenbosch Institute for... Read More →

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International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:40am - 11:15am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

11:15am

Jai (James) Syvitski: From politics to remote sensing: The Indus Flood of 2010 – unfolding of a disaster
The Pakistan flooding, July-November 2010, caused ~2000 fatalities, displaced 20,000,000 inhabitants for weeks to many months, and was 7.5 on a duration-area affected-intensity scale that compares flood magnitudes on a global basis. Exceptional damage was inflicted on crops and cropland and on agriculture support systems such as canals and levees. Total economic impact reached 43 billion USD; 4,500,000 mainly agricultural workers lost their employment for 2010-2011. The catastrophic flood was associated with unusually intense but not unprecedented rainfall in the upland catchment. Most damage was caused by multiple failures of irrigation system levees, and by barrage-related backwater effects that initiated failures and led to avulsions (sudden changes in flow location). The meteorological events did not cause the catastrophe. Instead, the lack of planned accommodation to the river's high sediment load set the stage for super-elevation of the Indus above the surrounding terrain, dangerous levee failures, and channel avulsions. The dynamics of this remarkable event demonstrate that planning for major flow diversions is a necessary component of effective flood control along this and other avulsion-prone rivers. This disaster will serve as an example to discuss the ‘lessons learnt’ for all stakeholders.

Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

Speakers
avatar for Jai (James) Syvitski

Jai (James) Syvitski

Professor / Director, International Geosphere-Biosphere Program, University of Colorado, INSTAAR
Professor James “Jai” Syvitski received doctorate degrees (Oceanography & Geological Science) from the University of British Columbia in 1978, where he developed a quantitative understanding of particle dynamics across the land-sea boundary. He held a variety of appointments within Canadian universities (1978-1995: U. Calgary, Dalhousie U., U. Laval, Memorial U., and INRS-oceanologie) and was a Senior Research Scientist within the... Read More →

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International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 11:15am - 11:50am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

11:50am

Plenary IV: Q & A
Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 11:50am - 12:15pm
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

12:15pm

Lunch
Sponsors & Partners
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ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 12:15pm - 1:30pm
Centre for Community Dining Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

1:30pm

A Whole Systems Approach to Education Redesign: A Case Study on the Need for Inter-Generational Perspectives and Inclusion
2740 This study was commissioned by the Global Education Futures forum for presentation at its fourth International Conference in Moscow, Russia, from 29 February to 2 March 2016 (http://edu2035.org/#program). The objective was to conduct field research with a special focus on the vision of the future of education held by young people. This report presents some views and perspectives of my generation regarding what they want education to be like in the future. In northern California, my teachers Ms. B and Mr. Wahanik used the framework of questions and activities that my father and I developed to gather this kind of information by running a sort of “focus group” with my 10th Grade class and to find out what their views, perspective, opinions, ideas, hopes and concerns are regarding this theme. This group consisted of mainly 15 and 16 year olds, and there are around 40 students in my class. They had less than an hour to run the whole process, but everyone already knew each other really well so they could go quickly through the process, as described in this report. A similar process was run with a group of young people in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Here I had to work with people whom I had never met before and who also didn't know each other at all. We had exactly 12 students from a variety of public and private schools with an age range from 12 to 17 years old. However, we had a total of three hours with them, so we could do an icebreaker and take our time to move through the whole thing. In both cases (California and Argentina), the idea was to engage young people in a series of structured creative Future Thinking adventures that helped them “invent” what education (learning and teaching) should be like in the year 2035. The idea behind this is that educators and those involved in the systemic re-design of education systems might want to include this kind of data and these kind of perspectives in the work they are doing. I would like to present my findings at the ISSS and to see whether others think more of this kind of work should be done.

Chairs
AL

Alexander Laszlo

Buenos Aires Institute of Technology (ITBA)

Tuesday July 26, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 1B51

1:30pm

An Integrative Model of Four-Phase Adaptive Evolution in Organizations
2793 How do organizations become order-created and extinct through emergence and immergence in their evolutionary dynamic states? How macrosimplicity emerges from microcomplexity and how sophisticated behavior emerges from the interaction of relatively simplistic parts? Organization scholars have debated those questions for decades, but only recently have they been to gain insight into combining the linear and non-linear dynamics that lead to organizational bottom-up emergence and top- down immergence by explorative and exploitative learning, through the use of the complexity science. Two intriguing features of complex systems have been discussed in this paper: simple behavior at the high level emerging from convoluted underpinnings, and sophisticated behavior at the low level immerging from simple underpinnings. Complexity theory has sometimes concerned itself with the one sort of bottom-up emergence, sometimes with the other top- down immergence, and sometimes it seems to aim for both at the same time, seeking to explain behaviors that are both surprisingly stable and surprisingly sophisticated. Studied for organization science research, this paper summarizes these literatures, including the first comprehensive review of macro-simplicity and micro-complexity, cybernetic modernism, chaotic postmodernism and organizing postmodernity’s chaos in each of the 20 complexity science disciplines. In doing so, the paper makes a bold proposal for a discipline of organizational bottom-up emergence and top- down immergence by explorative and exploitative learning, and proposes an integrative model of four-phase adaptive evolution in organizations. The paper begins with a detailed premise of organizational theories, models and phenomena of order-creation and extinction, and then rigorously maps the processes of order-creation and extinction discovered by that complexity science to identify a four-phase adaptive evolution model in organizations. By way of conclusion, the author expects the four-phase adaptive evolution model could be applied to enact bottom-up emergence and top- down immergence by explorative and exploitative learning within and across organizations. Key words: bottom-up emergence, top- down immergence, exploration, exploitation, four-phase adaptive evolution

Tuesday July 26, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 265

1:30pm

CONSYS Approach for Building: A Link Between CONOPS and System Models in the Context of Model-Based Systems Engineering
2728 According to US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Planning Report 02-3, across the entire system development life cycle (SDLC), 70% of the defects are introduced in the Requirements Gathering and Analysis/Architectural Design stage. Enterprise Level Concept of Operations (CONOPs) may exist but are not linked to system models. The missing link between CONOPs and system models causes the requirements either inadequately or incorrectly defined. As systems become more complex and concepts continue evolving, there is a need for approaches that combine CONOPs with system models to build an integrated modelling environment. This paper proposes a CONSYS approach that extends system models to CONOPs in the context of Model-Base System Engineering (MBSE). This paper evaluates the benefits of this CONSYS approach. The goal is to build a link between CONOPs and system models so that CONOPs are baselined and change controlled as the way system models are. SysML has been widely adopted as the language to capture system models. A case study example is presented to demonstrate the CONSYS approach using a SysML tool and to show the benefits of this approach. The areas for further research is also discussed in this paper.

Chairs
avatar for Janet Singer

Janet Singer

Liaison to INCOSE, jwillissinger@measures.org
Janet Singer is a leader in joint efforts by ISSS and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) to ‘co-mature’ systems science and systems engineering as disciplines that share a common systems thinking and systems appreciation core. She is a second-generation member of ISSS. Her father, Roger F. Willis, was a mathematician who headed the first systems research group at Stanford Research Institute. For the past three... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 245

1:30pm

How Teaching Cybernetics, in any Discipline, Can Bring Forth Systemic Change
2836 One way educators can work toward meaningful change in socio-ecological systems is to foster transformative change in students’ thinking. Since today’s students are tomorrow’s decision-makers, it can be argued that we have a responsibility to help students develop an understanding of how knowledge is constructed so that they might take responsibility for how they make sense of our world and see the connection between knowing and acting. Specifically, the reform in thinking needed is from our culturally conditioned habits of reductionism, duality, and linear thinking to more relational, systemic thinking. Educators are largely responsible for shaping the minds, values, and perceptions of students. We hope to inspire more educators to take their responsibility to heart and foster the kind of complex thinking that students will need to address the increasingly complex problems of our pluralistic world. In this presentation we will share our experiences, as teacher and student, in Creative Systemic Studies, an online doctoral program founded on the principles of cybernetics and systems thinking. Since epistemological change is transdisciplinary, it does not matter what discipline we teach in when we attempt to change minds. The Creative Systemic Studies program was designated a non-clinical Marriage and Family Therapy degree, yet students’ transformative learning experiences were not discipline-specific; they were triggered, in part, by learning cybernetics. In fact, students frequently testified that cybernetics changed their personal relationships and how they attended to the issues they were involved in, including homelessness, coaching youth, missionary work, grassroots organizing for social change, and therapeutic practices. Using a few concepts from cybernetics as examples - control, feedback, and distinctions - we will show how the principles of cybernetics can be creatively presented and integrated into any course of study. And we will show how these concepts influenced the way students think and know. We will also use these examples to highlight the fundamental principle of second order cybernetics which is that the observer is inextricable from - and responsible for - her observing. After introducing students to the subjective nature of interpretation and engaging this topic from multiple perspectives, students begin to see how their biases, values, and past experiences influence how they make meaning. Our knowing is necessarily self-referential and participatory. Cybernetics, General Systems Theory, chaos and complexity theories each have differences and a range of interpretations yet they are unified in that they all indicate a way of thinking that is intrinsically different from the reductionist/objectivist/deterministic orientation of modernist, rational thought. We use cybernetics as our exemplar for teaching students to think differently because we like it so much, but any of these theories would represent, and foster, epistemological change. We assert that changing minds has profound consequences because habits of mind become habits of action. Furthermore, every way of knowing contains an ethical trajectory. The ethical trajectory of cybernetics includes knowing that since we construct meanings, we are responsible for them - and we must respect this responsibility in others. Inspiring and developing in students a paradigmatic change from objectivity to a self-referential, participatory epistemology fundamentally concerned with responsibility is a nontrivial way that educators can foster meaningful change in socio-ecological systems. Additionally, it makes teaching even more exciting and satisfying.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 1B55

1:30pm

Ingenieros Sin Fronteras Colombia: Improvement of the Water Quality In the Community of Santa Isabel de Potosí
2780 Santa Isabel rural community is located between the municipalities of Guasca and La Calera in Colombia, it was composed of different stakeholders that coexist around the “El Asilo” creek. The people collect water from this water source for consumption and daily use. The water comes from Chingaza moorland, one of top three of water generation ecosystems in the country. Given the close relationship between the community and the ecological system, the environmental damage of this creek has generated big problems in health and quality of life of the inhabitants. Through joint work with the community was proposed a project called "Improvement of the quality of water in the community of Santa Isabel de Potosi". The group with the community is nowadays performing an analysis based on community-based decision-making taking into account the possible alternatives that could be implemented in order of diminishing in some percentage the impact of the issue and this way try to avoid the complete deterioration of the brook and the ecosystems in the area. Among the alternatives of intervention these are found: generation of a new method of community cooperation in behalf of the sanitation of the brook and the implementation of homemade filters in the improvement of the quality of the drinking water. This paper presents the analysis of the problem taking into account different points of view such as the environmental as well as the organizational one, highlighting the fact that this is not an isolated issue but an evidence of the possible environmental disaster that Colombia could live if nothing is done at the right time. Also this paper presents how engineering and work with the communities has been able to define the guidelines of intervention that are going to allow the next stage of the project, putting in practice the solutions proposed in behalf of a better quality of life.

Chairs
DF

Dennis Finlayson

Retired, dennisfinlayson56@yahoo.com
ISSS Retired

Tuesday July 26, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 200

1:30pm

Participatory Action-Research as a Methodology for the Development of Appropriate Technologies by Communities
2760 The social and environmental development potential of countries like Colombia, shows the need to articulate right from the communities, the processes and projects relevant to their territories. Furthermore when vital aspects of human health, such as access to clean water and water consumption, are also opportunities for the development of innovative technological solutions, stemming from the relationship between society and natural systems. In Colombia, for example, 62% of the municipalities have a medium to high risk of water availability vulnerability, and the remaining ones are on areas hard to reach or with a low population density. This amount increases to 80% if only the main cities are taken into account, which points to the importance of an efficient water resources management. In this context, a group of researchers together with a community of about 1,500 children and 15 teachers from schools of several municipalities of Cundinamarca department (Colombia), have been developing a technological platform founded on the community-based action research proposal of Ernest Stringer. This interactive technological platform, based on the use of SMS and the web, is called the “La Liga del Agua”. It is a jointly constructed space where synergies between the different stakeholders around the proper use of water resources can arise, based on the self-recognition of waste water problems on each of the participants’ homes. Thus, the problem is approached from the daily practices and the technological inefficiency, generating an empowerment of the water importance. The main theoretical foundation of this technological co-construction is based on the spirit of participatory and democratic systemic intervention, from the soft systems methodology of Peter Checkland, as well as the socio-cultural vision of the community that, voluntarily, intend to solve a problem collectively, as suggested by Rusell Ackoff. In this participatory co-construction, the following aspects were considered: i) the supply and environmental care systems are mediated by the interaction between the community stakeholders, ii) to develop solutions, it is not enough with the construction of appropriate technologies, research processes aimed at social appropriation of innovation are essential, and finally iii) the knowledge management, the use of technology and the impact of the teachers in the development of socio-environmental skills of the participating students. In this article, we will show the jointly design process of the “La Liga del Agua” platform and the incidence on the increase of the good practices of water resources usage. In addition, the results of the teaching strategies and recreational activities that seek to increase the empowerment by the actors and their interaction with the technology, will be presented. To conclude, all the learnings of the proposal will be introduced, so it can be replicated on other contexts with environmental concerns.

Chairs
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
ECCR 151

1:30pm

2934
2934

Chairs
avatar for Len Troncale

Len Troncale

Director, General Systems Research, Development, and Consulting
Dr. Len Troncale is Professor Emeritus of Cell and Molecular Biology, and past Chairman of the Biology Department at California State Polytechnic University. He is also Director of the Institute for Advanced Systems Studies, and Coordinator of its NSF-supported Systems Integrated Science General Education Program. He has served as VP and Managing Director of the International Society for General Systems Research (SGSR), and President of the... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Benson 180

2:00pm

2797
2797

Chairs
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 151

2:00pm

Addressing the Whole Whole
2807 This paper argues the need to develop a comprehensive, coherent, system-oriented description of the universe, and that doing so over time is quite feasible with the right approach. Charles Francois has stated: "We are indeed still - and mostly unconsciously - subservients to the general Cartesian reductionist model, which, after destroying the relationships network for the sake of 'simplicity', does never reconstruct it as an organized whole." This implies that the most important mission of the systems movement is to reconstruct the organized whole. We are deterred from this mission because of its apparent difficulty. It has long been recognized that "the whole" must be addressed to understand a system. But what exactly is "the whole"? The whole includes all of a system's parts. It also includes the relationships and processes of interactions among the objects and with the environment. And it requires addressing all in concert. (Let's call this all of the whole.) Furthermore, since a system's environment consists of other systems, these other systems must be considered part of the whole. This line of thinking expands the scope of the whole and when taken to its logical conclusion encompasses the entire universe. Hence the whole must be interpreted to mean not just a single system but the universal system of systems (the whole whole). While instances of the system pattern are interesting individually, the system pattern is most significant as a key element of the architecture of the universe. Finally, the universe is evolving, not static. The deep hierarchies of systems existing today provide clear evidence of continuing system evolution since the Big Bang. Hence the universal process of system evolution (whole history) must also be included in the whole. The whole means all of the interconnections within the broadest scope of space and time. It means the universe viewed as a system of systems, including all of the whole, the whole whole, and system evolution over the whole history. How can a system so large and complex be addressed? The system pattern, being fundamental to the functioning, structure, and evolution of the universe, provides a basis for organizing a universal description. While we can never describe the universe completely, we can develop and persistently improve and extend a description of the web of interacting systems. To do so we must systematically integrate, unify, and generalize the relevant nuggets filtered out of the existing vast sea of information. With modern tools and techniques the complexity of such an effort can be managed. The dominant approach for centuries has ignored systems in order to avoid complexity. The opposite trade-off is now required: we must embrace complexity so as to understand systems. By embracing and learning to effectively manage complexity, it is possible to describe the whole in the broadest sense and so to develop an unprecedented understanding of the universe as a system of systems. This paper aims to show that doing so is now viable.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 265

2:00pm

Civilization, Technology, and Money: The Challenge of a Human Fit
2795 Civilization in its science-enabled industrial form highlights and gives exponential growth to forms of agency and motivation so removed from the dynamics of eco-systemic mutual constraint that the troubled culture-nature interface has finally assumed the proportions of a sustainability crisis. With the emergence about 12,000 years ago of agriculture and the subsequent rise of the complex, settled societies we refer to as “civilization,” our models of ourselves and of the world transformed in ways that decisively separated the character of human agency and motivation from the behaviors by which other forms of life make a living. The science-enabled Industrial Revolution made central and self-aware the long-nurtured civilized thrust to control and shape the world to our purposes, refining that mindset into what Jacques Ellul has described as the “technological mind,” the probing seach for an improved way of doing whatever we turn our minds to. With this mentality technology has moved to center stage both as our first resort in approaching any kind of problem and as our chief lever for economic growth. We have collapsed the constraints of space and time and the world of nature is quite outflanked by the speed and power with which thoughts and plans in the human mind can reshape and modify environments from the expectations structured into the way other species make a living. This puts a new and critical weight on the thoughts, feelings, and motivation of the human mind-and-heart. All living beings are motivated to act in order to achieve and maintain well-being. But human motivation is far from the direct response to needs and dangers common to other forms of life. Our motivation as action is mediated by technology, and our technology loops back to shape our motivation. As a well-being guided response our motivation is mediated by money, which offers none of the inherent guidance of actual well-being. The “better” achievement of whatever that is the animating thrust of technology promises an open-ended more: more productivity, more speed, more convenience, more ease. And at the heart of money is another more, the profit motive that guides us to proud achievements and likewise to humiliating dysfunction. We market the promise of the technological “more” for profit, and the drive for more profit powerfully fuels the technological drive for all sorts of innovation. Thus the incremental thrusts embedded in technology and money work in synergy to bring us to the exponential burst of transformation in culture and the natural world. In the process guidance of real well-being becomes hit or miss, distorted by a thirst for and expectation of novelty stoked by endless advertising or overshadowed in the anxious pursuit of profit. Seeing the deep structures that have brought civilization so rapidly to such an innovative and world-transforming peak reveals no easy answers: we cannot simply change ourselves without the difficult and uncertain process of reconfiguring elements structured into civilization that make us the kind of unpredictable and uncontrollable species we are at present. But it helps to know there are other ways available, perhaps even other ways of doing a civilization. If those alternatives are in any way open to our deliberate contrivance, that deliberation will have to include serious reflection on how the way we maintain our well-being has come to fit so ill with the well-being as pursued in the rest of the community of life. For humans, understanding is the guide to moving into a better future. Keywords: civilization, technology, money, motivation, Neo-lithic Revolution, Industrial Revolution

Chairs
DF

Dennis Finlayson

Retired, dennisfinlayson56@yahoo.com
ISSS Retired

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 200

2:00pm

Crucial Institutional Innovations: Evolutionary Change in Higher Education
2752 In 1969, Erich Jantsch published his paper about the disruptive forces affecting higher education and society. He was serving as a research associate at MIT and studying the futures of MIT and the American University at the time. Jantsch (1969) said students were concerned about whether the college curriculum was relevant. Meanwhile, society was concerned about the degrading side effects of technology on the systems of human living, cities, and the natural environment. Lastly, Jantsch pointed to the rising concern about the lack of systems and futures thinking. He coined these concerns “disruptive forces” and believed that the university was well-positioned to assume a new leadership role in society in order to assist in transforming these concerns. Jantsch predicted (hoped for) five crucial institutional innovations in order to transform disruptions into “cohesive forces”. Jantsch passed away ten years after the publication of this document and didn’t have the opportunity to see if his ideas came to fruition. Using a mixed methods approach, this study explores the evolution of higher education institutions by posing questions that revolve around Jantsch’s five crucial innovations, including a new purpose for the university, socio-technological system engineering, altering the structure of the university, re-orienting the operational principles of the university, and a more active relationship between the new university and society. Five institutions highly referenced for their innovation will be invited to participate in this research. Jantsch’s “crucial innovations” frame this investigative study. The conceptual framework consists of the concepts of disruptive forces, the three functions of higher education, self-renewal, and integrative planning. This paper will present the preliminary findings to this study. Keywords- Erich Jantsch, higher education, disruptive forces, self-renewal, integrative planning, innovation.

Chairs
AL

Alexander Laszlo

Buenos Aires Institute of Technology (ITBA)

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 1B51

2:00pm

Systemic Integration on Spatial Knowledge in Business
2732 A model to achieve technological development (DT) is proposed, in particular a satellite, with the following sub phases: 1.Analysis of International satellite system; 2. Analysis of the National satellite system; 3.diagnose, using the SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats); 4. Proposed solution; 5.Mission, vision, values and strategic objectives of the proposal; 6.Strategias using SWOT combinations: FO, FA, OD and AD; 7.Action plan; 8. Technological development. With analysis and diagnosis it was found that one of the great strengths in this country is the development of scientific research, in particular space, since the forties, but it is isolated, ie, not integrated in the productive industry and therefore state policy proposes establishing humanistic satellite companies to promote and preserve the ecology, self-financing, public, mixed, or private initiative, integrating scientific, basic and applied research, based on the goals, objectives and marketing strategies. Companies call for the design, construction and launch of satellites, thus providing efficient, fast, safe and cheap services to meet the demand of domestic and international users, as developed countries have done through their space agencies, in order to have DT in this area.

Chairs
avatar for Janet Singer

Janet Singer

Liaison to INCOSE, jwillissinger@measures.org
Janet Singer is a leader in joint efforts by ISSS and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) to ‘co-mature’ systems science and systems engineering as disciplines that share a common systems thinking and systems appreciation core. She is a second-generation member of ISSS. Her father, Roger F. Willis, was a mathematician who headed the first systems research group at Stanford Research Institute. For the past three... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 245

2:00pm

The Illusion of Technology: A Generational Perception on the Need for a Human-Centered Approach in Dealing with Developments of Science and Technology
2842 We are at the turning point of an era with a huge potential of change in which humanity can decide to finally address the failures of our economic, social, governance and belief systems. However the current narrative build around the hopes of being saved by science and technology is getting more and more traction into a society in which digitalization, the illusion of zero marginal costs, sharing economies and big data seems to be the answer to our most pressing problems. This is ironical, since science and technology (S&T) have been not only central to the development model followed by human societies in the last centuries but often very effective instruments of mass destruction, environmental degradation and social exclusion. S&T have been definitely part of the problem, a key component of our model of economic development, and not only an exogenous factor as considered by mainstream economics, which anyway recognize their crucial role to improve productivity and sustain long-term growth. But they are also deemed to be the core of the solution, a paradoxical vision grounded in the idea that finding a technical fix is a good way to avoid the less comfortable question of how power and wealth are distributed in society and with what consequences. In particular the younger generation seems to be distracted by the excitement about technological and scientific new developments and its untapped potential. Addressing the systemic underlying root causes which are the real drivers of our problems is too complex compared to building the new app and the social enterprise that goes with it. While for previous generations changing the world for the better would require also political and social innovations, now it seems that S&T has even displaced every other source of hope. The launching of the latest digital artifact creates a widespread frenziness, but also a true and exciting entrepreneurial spirit is mobilized by the potential of technologies to address human challenges. In a sense, we put S&T at the core of societal evolution, or to say the least we do not conceive any transformation without them playing a significant role, and this is also why we think they should rescue us from all disasters, even those provoked by ourselves. In light of these developments I would like to emphasize the following questions in my contribution to ISSS 2016: How can we go beyond a paradigm of “S&T solutionism” and channel the huge potential these developments will bring? How can we change the route towards a future in which humanity has to adapt to digitalization and its consequences, instead of putting digitalisation at the service of humanity?

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
ECCR 1B55

2:30pm

A Categorization of Socio-Technical Systems Approaches based on Context and Purpose
2889 Socio- technical systems are systems where humans interact with technology (hardware or software) towards the achievement of a goal. Because of the presence of the human behavior and the constant change and evolution of technology, such systems are constantly changing and are difficult to define. Various approaches exist to analyze and understand socio-technical systems’ behaviors, however many of these approaches analyze socio-technical systems from a certain discipline’s weltanschauung, problem context, and purpose of the system. Therefore, the proposed approaches only provide partial definitions that are difficult to generalize. The objective of this research is to provide a categorization of socio-technical systems based on their context and purpose, within the functionalist systems paradigm(s). The resulting categorization will serve as a foundation for a socio-technical systems framework to assist analysis select and/or design the right socio-technical intervention approach based on context and purpose. Keywords: Socio-Technical systems, Critical Systems Thinking, Problem Context, Methodological Purpose, Systems Thinking

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 1B55

2:30pm

A Good Approach to Wicked Problems
2774 One of the reasons that systems thinking has developed over the years is to address problems that seemed to be unresolvable; the social equivalent of a Gordian knot. Since the term was first used in 1973 by Rittel and Weber (1973) these difficult problems have become known as “Wicked Problems”. A Wicked Problem is usually a social or cultural problem that is difficult or impossible to solve. Wicked problems become “wicked” not because they are innately evil , but due to the number of stakeholders, resources, lack of knowledge upon the subject, cost involved, the great possibility of unanticipated results and other factors that multiply the complexity of the issue to be addressed.. One of the defining characteristics of a Wicked Problem is that “solutions to wicked problems are not true or false, but good or bad. Ordinary problems have solutions that can be objectively evaluated as right or wrong. Choosing a solution to a wicked problem is largely a matter of judgment” Questions of what is the good and what is the bad are informed by systems of ethics. There are numerous ethical approaches to the ultimate question “what is to be done”? This paper argues that the version of American Pragmatism that has come to be known at Neo‐Pragmatism is a good choice to approach Wicked Problems. Neo‐ Pragmatism is uniquely suited to finding a “good” approach to a Wicked Problem due to the social nature of Wicked Problems. Since a Wicked Problem is fundamentally social it consists of constantly changing and shifting parts. If there is any stability in a Wicked Problem it is the stability of constant change. Neo‐ Pragmatism is founded on the understanding that all elements of human society are fundamentally contingent; that is to say that again the only constant is change. Neo‐ pragmatism is simply the only ethical structure that can readily adapt to the constant flux that is a Wicked Problem.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 265

2:30pm

A Systemic Model for Communication Innovation
2823 A Systemic Model for a telecommunications innovation system was designed with the proposal for technological development, to avoid situations that endanger the cancellation, by the International Union of Communications of the satellite orbits assigned to Mexico, and thus promote public and private investment through the integration of basic and applied scientific research in enterprises. The idea is to make appropriate innovations and make significant improvements to products, thus meeting the demands of domestic and international consumers. Keywords: Systemic model, innovation, and technological development.

Chairs
avatar for Janet Singer

Janet Singer

Liaison to INCOSE, jwillissinger@measures.org
Janet Singer is a leader in joint efforts by ISSS and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) to ‘co-mature’ systems science and systems engineering as disciplines that share a common systems thinking and systems appreciation core. She is a second-generation member of ISSS. Her father, Roger F. Willis, was a mathematician who headed the first systems research group at Stanford Research Institute. For the past three... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 245

2:30pm

Critical Systems Thinking Review on Decentralised Drinking Water Management in Nuali City, Indonesia
2843 This paper is based on a PhD project that strives to assess the performance of decentralised drinking water management in the city of Nauli, Indonesia. The implementation of decentralised government system followed by decentralizing some functions including drinking water services, is unsatisfactory in providing access to drinking water for all residents in the city of Nauli. Nauli Municipality that has just split up as an autonomous local government under the decentralized government system in Indonesia, is facing conflicts in providing water provision to the society, since there are three public water companies in this region: City PDAM, District PDAM, and Provincial BLUD. Furthermore, these governments and their water companies seem to forget the main objective of government in water provision as stated in the Indonesia Constitution: to fully control the water and manage it for meeting the people’s needs. The aim of this research is to apply Ulrich’s critical systems heuristics (CSH) to address the following research questions: (i) how effective is the current decentralized water management system?; and (ii) how the current system can be improved and what ought to be done? Keywords: Systems thinking, drinking water management, decentralisation, sustainability

Chairs
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 151

2:30pm

The Lighthouse - Innovating the Systems Sciences System
2771 The authors of this abstract sought to discover a way to communicate key systemic insights to a wider audience and the integration of those insights in real-life systems where they will have impact. The Lighthouse is a prototype alternative to traditional methods of disciplinary scholarship. The Lighthouse is a result of applying systems research, specifically systemic innovation, to the very system by which systems research is performed and communicated. A designed socio-technical system is added to complement the disciplinary organization, by taking advantage of recent advances in knowledge media research and development, and contemporary communication design. By design, The Lighthouse undertakes to fulfill in the systems movement, and in the CET SIG in particular, a function analogous to a lighthouse – of showing ‘stray ships’ (various change or sustainability or thrivability initiatives) a way to the safety of a ‘harbor’, which is an outpost of a ‘continent’ where issues can be handled and understood systemically. The Lighthouse focuses on a single key issue: Whether the evolution and control of core societal systems can be relegated to free competition (“the market”) – or whether it must be informed by systems research and insights. The current prototype has three phases: (1) synthesis or federation of points of view and results relevant to our issue, through a media-enabled transdisciplinary dialog of experts; (2) rendering the results of Phase One in accessible, communicable and engaging formats by applying state-of-the-art communication design; (3) strategic placement of the results of Phase Two in public sphere, and public awareness. The Lighthouse prototype is designed to evolve continuously, by observing how it meets the real-world challenges, and assimilating insights and results from relevant disciplines, notably the systems research and the knowledge media R&D. In this way this prototype of media-enabled transdisciplinary research is also conceived as a prototype ‘boundary object’ linking two communities and interests – systems research, and IT innovation. By it, systemic insights are allowed to directly influence technological, and also social-systemic innovation. The Lighthouse is part of our initiative to develop the CET SIG as a systemic innovation hub, where the emergence of better ways of transdisciplinary and transcommunity cross-fertilization is being curated.

Chairs
AL

Alexander Laszlo

Buenos Aires Institute of Technology (ITBA)

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 1B51

2:30pm

Typology of Social Actions Based on the Living System Theory
2745 It is impossible to make progress in social theory without inquiring about social actions; therefore, many leading sociologists refer to this notion in their work. Max Weber, Talcott Parsons and many other sociologists attempted to ground not only their works but also the science of sociology as a whole on a theory of social actions. Max Weber defined sociology as "the science which attempts the interpretative understanding of social action in order thereby to arrive at a casual explanation of its course and effects". Moreover, he explicitly singled out social action as the “central subject matter” of his sociology. Hence, comprehensive typology of social actions can be very helpful in sociological analysis. Usually, social actions are classified by actors’ intentions. In this paper, types of social actions are categorized both by actors’ intentions and by the actions’ results, including both the intentional and unintentional outcomes. This was achieved through consideration of the social actions in the framework of J.G. Miller’s living systems theory. This theory regards each living system as composed of 20 subsystems that process information and matter/energy inside the living system and between the living system and its environment. These 20 subsystems are considered at eight levels: cell, organ, organism, group, organization, community, society and supranational systems. The first three constitute the level of biological living systems; the other five comprise the level of social living systems. Social actions are interactions among living systems or among different parts of one living system at the social level. The proposed typology of social actions is based on analysis of developmental, reproductive and interactional processes in the social systems. In order to live and function, living systems must allow their matter/energy-processing subsystems to work, so all social actions in social living systems can be associated with the functioning of these subsystems. Seemingly, the number of goals for social actions as well as the number of their outcomes is very high, however, by relating principal intention and main outcome of the considered social action to specific matter/energy-processing subsystems, their number can be significantly reduced. This is done by determining the main subsystem that was intended to be affected by the planned social action, and the main subsystem that was actually impacted by it. In many cases, it is the same subsystem; that is, the intention coincides with the consequence. As a result of this analysis, the two-dimensional matrix of types of social actions was constructed, and the methodology of assigning any social action to a specific cell in the typological matrix was proposed. Every social action in this typology is designated by the names of the pair of the involved subsystems; if they coincide, the type is labeled by the name of one subsystem. Obviously, as in any classification, there also exists an element of arbitrariness in the relating of the social action to its type. More detailed typology of social actions on the basis of the living systems theory can be developed by including in the analysis the information-processing subsystems.

Chairs
DF

Dennis Finlayson

Retired, dennisfinlayson56@yahoo.com
ISSS Retired

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 200

3:00pm

Afternoon Break
Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
ECCR Lobby Engineering Building, University of Colorado

3:30pm

A Communication System for Socio-Ecological Processes
2887 This article outlines a unified Communication Theory linking cyber-systemic, and cyber-semiotic perspectives. The objective is explaining communication as an emergent system from the interaction process between socio-ecological systems. The emergent communication system seen from a unified perspective is applied as a participative integral transformation process toward the harmonic relationship between human communities and their dynamic social and natural environment. It includes the description of an evolutionary communication process between social and environmental leaders of organizational networks under real conditions. It describes the evolutionary stages of the communication system between different social and environmental leaders who have been working in social organizational networks of Mexico in the last thirty years. The last stage of this emergent communication process among social organizational networks leaders began in 2009, is called: the Ecosystemic Dialogues, it is communication system with qualitative complexity and critical awareness. It is a social laboratory of change under real conditions, through a participative action-research cybernetic process, for a harmonic and sustainable relationship between human and natural systems, through a complex communication dynamic. It is a process toward the sustainable systemic health of the planet. Keywords: Communication, cyber-semiotic, qualitative complexity, emergent properties, ecosystemic metaphor

Chairs
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 151

3:30pm

Comparing the Current ISIS and the (Not Yet) Past Leninist States (USSR and Pre-1979 China)
2791 What our media named as terrorism today are perceived as revolution by some. What we call revolution in mainland China and Russia, are no less violent and cruel than terrorism too. This paper observes and identifies the roots, the triggering historic events, the similarities among the differences, of the two huge phenomena and their two driving ideologies, i.e. the Extreme Islamism and the Bloody Communism, that have deep influence to our time and our daily life. As one of our subject has been just fading away into history (not really) and another is still going on while this paper is being written, we highlight the similarities or even isomorph of these two violent social phenomena, raising a question behind such similarity – what are the driven forces that enable these phenomena to emerge, or, why on this planet a certain number of people are doomed to believe, engage, fight for, and victimized by such pathological ideologies?

Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 245

3:30pm

Dynamics as Demarcation
2762 Like science, systems faces a demarcation problem. How might one specify what counts or doesn’t count as systemic thinking and practice? In this exploratory talk, I will review distinctions that others have drawn, and then describe a framework for understanding dynamics as a basis of distinction. This dynamics-as-demarcation approach has several advantages, including: illuminating various ways that systems thinking and practice have been described, historically and currently, and affording a “sweeping in” from across relevant academic fields of study and practice. A particular advantage of a dynamics-as-demarcation approach is the way in which it can be used to inform understandings of purposeful social change.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 200

3:30pm

Managing for the Health of Coupled Human and Natural Systems at the Watershed Scale
2800 Within all watersheds, ecosystem health is intrinsically linked to human health. The pathways of this coupling are multiple, diffuse and interacting. For example, the percentage of canopy cover in a given area is an indicator of both human and watershed health; more shade lowers surrounding temperature and helps to reduce rates of heat stress and skin cancer caused by sun exposure, and treed areas mitigate rainfall runoff, assist water infiltration and reduce risks of flooding. A recent study in Toronto found that having ten more trees on streets had a health impact equivalent to being seven years younger. To understand and manage such relationships requires an approach that appreciates the complex coupling of human and natural systems. The work we describe in this paper demonstrates an ecosystem approach to human health and well-being (a.k.a. an ecohealth approach) at the watershed scale. To explore the extent to which watershed governance agencies activity manage for both ecosystem and human health, we drew upon the Watershed Governance Prism to develop case studies and inform a self-assessment of five watershed governance organizations (the Fraser Basin Council, Cowichan Watershed Board, Save Our Seine Environment Inc., Otonabee Region Conservation Authority and Lake Simcoe and Region Conservation Authority). Through this work, we identified the need for a more strategic approach to watershed governance that actively seeks linkages with public health institutions to meet goals that are common to both the health and environment sectors. We found that watershed organizations’ programs affect the social and environmental determinants of health at multiple spatial and organizational scales, but awareness and indicators of the potential benefits are underdeveloped and poorly conceptualized. Stepping out from this study, researchers at York University and the Credit Valley Conservation Authority have collaborated on a project that seeks to understand and communicate the relationship among various watershed ecosystem components and human health and well-being. In the first phase of this project, we surveyed residents within the Credit River watershed about their perceptions of the connection(s) between their health and their surrounding environment, and we facilitated a workshop with governance stakeholders to identify key indicators of such relationships. Among our findings, we noted that some residents of the Credit River watershed understood that such fundamental relationships exist among the natural environment and their health. For example, many believed that places associated with water, such as streams and ponds, had a stronger effect on their health than other green spaces. We also found that older respondents had a greater appreciation of such connections than did younger respondents. Governance stakeholders identified several environmental indicators of health that would better communicate environment and health relationships. The top three were: percentage of canopy cover, access to green space, and percentage of impervious surfaces. We used this information in the design of an interactive web-based tool and geographic information system. This web-GIS displays provincial, regional, and municipal data related to the Credit River watershed, including indicators of health and descriptions of how they influence human health and well-being. It also includes a storytelling component that provides an opportunity for residents within the watershed to share personal experiences of their connection to the environment. The web-GIS is intended to educate the public about ecosystem services and their influence on people, and to demonstrate the impact of the work of Credit Valley Conservation not only on ecosystem health but also on human well-being. In the second phase of the project, we are further developing the web-GIS tool to support scenario planning for ecosystem and human health in the Credit River Watershed.

Chairs
avatar for Thomas Wong

Thomas Wong

Founder, Researcher, Lecturer, clinical practitioner, Ancient Balance Medicine Research Institute
SIG Chair: Health and System Thinking SIG | | Bachelor of Engineering with First Class Honours in IT | Bachelor of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Master of Engineering in Telecommunication | Therapist of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deep Tissue pain therapy (1991-now) | Chair of Health and Systems Thinking SIG of ISSS (2008-now) | Liasion officer of C&W region, Auxiliary Medical Service HKSAR (2006-now) | Permanent Honorary President of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 265

3:30pm

Opening the Field of Linguistic Design for Thrivability
2819 Language functions as a complex adaptive system. With time and circumstance, both its building blocks—the words that comprise it—and the guidelines according to which those blocks can be arranged—its grammar—are subject to evolution. Perhaps because it is often considered a function of culture, the question of how such linguistic evolution might be acted upon with intention is rarely considered. Yet language is no more a function of culture than culture of language. The two act interdependent and interdeterminant. And the manner in which disparate elements such as academic developments, political correctness, and pop culture drive linguistic change is both uncoordinated and acting on relatively weak leverage points. The foundational concern of this paper will be the ways in which the structures of language affect human behavior. It will employ existing research from the field of comparative economics to suggest the importance of approaching linguistic evolution from an idealized design perspective arguing that sustainability and thrivability are outcomes which, to be realized, must be supported by the language employed in their pursuit. Though this paper will, to some extent, address the role of neologisms in linguistic evolution, its focus will be on the more foundational aspects of language—on grammatical structures such as verb tense, possessives, pronouns, and article usage—and the behaviors they most readily facilitate. Just as a systems approach to organizational behavior must look beneath events and patterns for the structures and mental models that underlie them, this paper is intended to serve as the starting point of large scale inquiry into the mental models that are embedded in the linguistic structures of English and how they might be altered to better support human wellness. As the first global language, English is not only a convenient central test case for the inquiries of this paper, it is also an impactful one. In investigating the structures of English and the mental models they embody, the field of comparative linguistics will be pertinent providing points of comparison from other languages. By seeing what variations of language have evolved elsewhere, the project of envisioning an idealized version of English will provide itself with a range of possibilities upon which to draw. In that language is adaptive and contextual, it will not be possible for this paper to prescribe a final version of what is being proposed. Rather, the goals of the paper will be to propose the importance of this design question alongside suggestions about possible directions responses to it might take. In that its central argument will be that linguistic design is a field to which time and effort should be dedicated, this paper will also have to address the question of whether the changes proposed are realistic. In arguing that they are, evidence of how this approach has already been successfully employed and a summary description of how existing resources and networks might be employed in its realization will be presented.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 1B55

3:30pm

Patterns that Connect: Exploring the Potential of Patterns and Pattern Languages in Systemic Interventions towards Realizing Sustainable Futures
2778 “On each continent and in each nation one can find creative bubbling, a multitude of political initiatives in the direction of economic, social, political, cognitive, educational, ethical or existential regeneration. But everything that must be connected is yet dispersed, fragmented, separated. These initiatives are not aware of each other, no institution enumerates them, and no one is familiar with them. They are nonetheless the breeding stock for the future. It is now a matter of recognizing, aggregating, enlisting them in order to open up transformational paths. These multiple paths, jointly developing, will intermesh to form a new Path which will decompose the path we are following, and which will guide us toward the still invisible and inconceivable metamorphosis.” (Morin, 2011, p34) Working towards more sustainable systems is a critical endeavor of the 21st century requiring collaborative efforts for the broad development of systemic literacy. This paper explores the potential of patterns and pattern languages as tools for systemic change and transdisciplinary collaboration, investigation and design, and outlines the ways they could be further operationalized to develop and leverage collective intelligence and agency towards Curating the Emergence of Thrivability and Realizing Sustainable Futures in Socio-Ecological Systems. Considering patterns and pattern languages, social organization, and systemic change from a variety of perspectives, the author suggests that the concept of pattern has an unfulfilled potential as cognitive technology for meaning-making, mediation, systemic configuration and exchange of knowledge, both within and across domains of human activity. In particular, patterns have properties that could help address the unity versus diversity dilemma while dealing with complex challenges. Rather than giving a complete theoretical review of the field of transdisciplinarity and systemic change, the paper sets key elements of the context and investigates possibilities and directions for future work. Starting with an outline of the nature and dimensions of the complexity challenges the world is faced with from a systemic and cybernetic perspective, the paper explores the versatile properties and functions of patterns and shows how they could help conceive and develop a whole family of tools for systemic focus, interpretation and connectivity. Finally, it presents possibilities of applications of pattern-based approaches in transdisciplinary intervention contexts, using patterns as boundary objects to bring into focus different dimensions of complexity. Keywords: complex systems, patterns, pattern languages, systems literacy, critical systems thinking

Chairs
AL

Alexander Laszlo

Buenos Aires Institute of Technology (ITBA)

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm
ECCR 1B51

3:30pm

Art and Performance
Workshop

Chairs
AL

Alexander Laszlo

Buenos Aires Institute of Technology (ITBA)
avatar for Mila Popovitch

Mila Popovitch

Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher, University of Colorado
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder | Mila Popovich is an interdisciplinary scholar, an awarded performing artist in multiple dance forms, and a bilingual poet. With expertise in Comparative Literature and Humanities ,her current work focuses on the issues of woman’s migrations and migrant women's subjectivity in relation to globalization processes. | | She is an Associate Fellow at the World... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Benson 180

4:00pm

Analogical Reasoning on Creation
2892 People get empirical knowledge through experience. It makes people being available to imagine something and reason several possible-world which could be happened in the future. Here are differences between knowledge by education and knowledge by experience. Empirical knowledge is not for reaching a certain answer what is required at education. This is useful when we need to have multi-answers and making a response to unpredictable objects. To experience world is meant that something interacts with objects and subjects with cognition. This zone could be called ‘the field where cognition and act coexist’. Furthermore, if we start to concern relations between cognition and act, the following questions are arisen “how to transfer feeling by body to perception in which is cognition part?” and “how people have utilized those abilities in real world?”. I focus on creation process to the above questions. In creation, human would utilize their whole knowledge spontaneously. Thus it is produced by creativity which one of the most important abilities in creation, even though we don’t know where is creativity and what is it precisely. In this paper, I argue how analogical reasoning works between cognition and target object. I discuss possible way how this research reaches to enhance creations in creativity way.

Chairs
AL

Alexander Laszlo

Buenos Aires Institute of Technology (ITBA)

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 1B51

4:00pm

Architectural Parallels Between Biological and Engineered Solutions in Defence and Security €“ Adaption, Anticipation, and Sustainment.
2813 Bio-mimetics have often provided a useful means of inspiration for engineering design – for instance in fabrication of materials for aerospace. One more recent area of interest, from the perspective of cyber security has been in the remarkable ability of the immune system to cope with the diversity and evolution of threats such as bacteria and viruses. The focus of this presentation is to further examine the architectural parallels between biological systems and engineered solutions in defence and security. Systems thinking and modelling are the tools utilized in examining the architectures and the capabilities of the biological systems such as anticipatory, adaptability and sustainability. In performing such an examination it is anticipated that insight and potential improvements may be found in both directions – improvements in our approaches to combat complex disease and also possible inspiration in the science, architectures and designs for our sustainable systems.

Chairs
avatar for Thomas Wong

Thomas Wong

Founder, Researcher, Lecturer, clinical practitioner, Ancient Balance Medicine Research Institute
SIG Chair: Health and System Thinking SIG | | Bachelor of Engineering with First Class Honours in IT | Bachelor of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Master of Engineering in Telecommunication | Therapist of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deep Tissue pain therapy (1991-now) | Chair of Health and Systems Thinking SIG of ISSS (2008-now) | Liasion officer of C&W region, Auxiliary Medical Service HKSAR (2006-now) | Permanent Honorary President of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 265

4:00pm

Bringing Forth the Ecological Economy
2884 This paper looks at the development of Ecological Economic theory through the lens of second-order cybernetics. Ecological Economics aims to integrate Ecological and Economic disciplines while maintaining their distinction. This is required for the concept of “scale” which relates the size of the ecosystem with the size of the economy. Beyond the dynamic and complicated nature of these systems; this task is also conceptually difficult. How can the ecosystem be part of the economy but also distinct from it? How can the economic system be part of the ecosystem and also distinct? Which is the correct framing? While Ecological Economics was conceived in the era of “open systems” and “sub-systems”, second order systems theory may shed light on the paradoxes which naturally arise from this perspective. As second-order systems theory would suggest, this fundamental paradox of observation results in a circularity. This circularity can be illustrated by attempts within Ecological Economics to generate definitions of sustainability; most notoriously through valuation of ecosystem services but also within alternative social and ecologically based models. This yields a tension between a desire for objectivity and submission to relativity. Thus, authors within the field are calling for clarity regarding ontological and epistemological commitments. Second-order systems theory operates within this territory even if it does so on its own terms. By embracing this circularity with second-order cybernetics, a few possibilities open up. Primarily, it is my interest that the “organization” of the Ecological Economy be considered; such that the diversity of activities which considered within the domain of Ecological Economics become coordinated. As a student of both Ecological Economics and systems theory, I have been fascinated by the ongoing efforts within Ecological Economics to construct a perspective. This offers a great example of recursive cybernetics with natural tensions between variety and order.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 200

4:00pm

Evolution of Supply Chain Management Towards Green Supply Chain Management: Drivers and Their Impact
2872 Historically, the evolution of supply chain management passed in four stages: the physical distribution management (1960s); the logistics management (1970s-1980s), the SCM (1980s-1990s) and the Green Supply chain Management (1990- Till now). Green supply chain management (GSCM) integrates environmental thinking into supply chain management; from conceptual product design to the delivery of final product to the consumers, and also involves end-of-life management. The implementation of GSCM is supported by few factors which are known as GSCM drivers. The aim of this paper is to study the state of green supply chain in the Lebanese food industry and investigate focally on the drivers affecting GSCM. To approach this investigation, we selected four companies due to their size in the Lebanese food industry.

Chairs
avatar for Gerhard Chroust

Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Emeritus, Systems Engineering, Johannes Kepler Univ. Linz
Gerhard Chroust is an Austrian systems scientist, and Professor Emeritus for Systems Engineering and Automationat the Institute of System Sciences at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria. Chroust is an authority in the fields of formal programming languages and interdisciplinary information management.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 245

4:00pm

How to Design All Together? The Triple Bottom Line
2833 Business´ owners want their enterprises are profitable, and that profits stay forever. In other words, they want business economic and financially sustainable. Citizens want business socially responsible, and also environmentally careful, and contribute to recover it. The liquid societies (Bauman, 2000) create and destroy markets very quickly, and shareholders demand CEOs adapts their enterprises to those changes, maintaining profitable. Corruption scandals promote strong society claims, demand ethic behaviors. There are more sights about the environment. Paris signature authorities tell “these are not enough” (Paris Climate Agreement, 2016). There are theoretical papers about each of these aspects, but there aren’t a holistic view trying to find systemic answers. How have enterprises that are simultaneously sustainable, ethically behavior in all domains, and environmentally responsible: Are enough to choose a CEO who can make the triple goals? Can move the enterprise with a consulting work to the triple ends? Must promulgate laws, with strong penalties, to force enterprises to obtain the triple line? Is it necessary to (re-) design the enterprise to put on the way to the triple results? The first three questions are not enough. To choose a CEO with those capabilities is possible only for a few numbers of organizations, if it is possible. Consulting is, by definition, limited in time, and it needs a corporation’s behavior for the entire life. And if we have laws about, they cannot explain how to do it. It’s necessary that ALL the company, their members and all around collaborate and coordinate to have a chance to arrive. In recent times there are proposals to a new way of enterprises, with linked profit business with social impact and environment, call hybrid organizations. They try to generate at the same time, economic, social and environmental value (triple bottom line). Combine the current concepts of sustainability and systemic impact on all the dimensions requires a new design. In general, it is observed that the treatment of comprehensive way concerned is omitted. It focuses from one or another aspect, emphasis on certain features, but not about taking the overall design, which makes it difficult to appear companies at the same time achieve sustainability on all fronts. Those that exist are shown as successful examples, but is veiled how they succeeded, and the small number shown not allow inferring a viable design. It is about advancing the design companies that meet all requirements and work in line with the systemic dimensions that define Sustainability. Design tools and business models wide target. How to design organizations broad objectives that are sustainable from economic, social and environmental perspective, taking into account its surroundings and prospects? Cybernetic models available, such as VSM, systemic tools developed in recent decades, as models of Ackoff, Ulrich, Jackson, Checkland, Bosch, among others, suggest that counted with enough devices to address the design of this new type of companies. It is necessary to consider the behaviors of businessmen, culture and expectations, since what is being proposed are, to some extent, a Copernican shift in the way of acting and directing companies. It is necessary to consider that it will be necessary not only explain the design, especially its possible results and advantages compared to traditional. Today, when Millennium Development Goals post 2015 seeking simultaneously to defeat the scourge of poverty, and lead humanity to sustainable development, we must make all the productive forces in each place are aligned to work simultaneously on all fronts: economic, social, environmental, etc. This requires having previously developed academic responses, otherwise treated no objectives or goals but mere wishful thinking. Perhaps this is a small step in the right direction.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 1B55

4:00pm

Positive Systems Science: Using Positive Psychology to bring Systems Science to Life
2777 This paper introduces Positive Systems Science (PSS), which combines the strength-based lens of positive psychology with the holistic lens of system science, with the ultimate goal of bringing about desired systems change that supports the well-being of living systems. Systems science is an interdisciplinary field that studies the nature of systems—from simple to complex. Positive psychology aims to empirically understand and build wellbeing, resilience, and optimal function in individuals, organizations, and communities (Seligman & Csikzsentmihalyi, 2000). Like a pair of spectacles, each lens is valuable in and of itself, but we suggest that the synthesis of the two fields transcends the value of either one alone. Systems theory draws from diverse disciplines, including biology, sociology, ecology, engineering, computer science and philosophy. It enables interdisciplinary dialogue between autonomous areas as well as within the science itself. Although there are numerous approaches within systems science, they share three common aspects: 1)A desire to understand inter-relationships; 2)A commitment to multiple perspectives and 3)An awareness of boundaries (Williams & van’t Hof, 2014). Despite its successes and the potential of the science to address the complexity of real world problems, system science has never captured the attention of a wide audience. There is a vast literature on systems theory and methods that newcomers can feel overwhelmed, with nowhere to start. New users have to master a large number of theories, ideas and techniques and a subscription to a particular view of what system thinking is. Further, there is a lack of research on its practical application. In contrast, positive psychology has successfully engaged researchers, professionals, policy makers, and the general public, with scholarship in the field increasing by 410% of the past decade (Rusk & Waters, 2015). It provides scientific understanding of the human psyche and methods for affecting mindsets, motivations, and individual behaviors. We suggest that positive psychology adds value to systems thinking theory by emphasizing the importance of mindsets and motivations, and methods for shifting individual behaviour. Further, drawing on its strategies for connecting with various audiences, positive psychology can help make systems tools more useable, practical, and engaging. As an example, we demonstrate how a commonly used systems framework, Peter Senge’s ‘system archetypes’ can be adapted and strengthened by interpreting the archetypes from a positive lens. We will show how making tools more user friendly invites researchers from other disciplines, policy makers and practitioners to try on parts of the theory and benefit without having to master a large number of ideas and techniques before they can apply them in their work and life. Notably, the popularity of positive psychology has come at the cost of application going well beyond the science, with interventions and programs blindly implemented while ignoring the complex context in which people reside. Systems science challenges positive psychology to add sophistication to the methods and theories, which better captures real world experiences. Systems tools can take positive psychology to a deeper level that will have more sustainable impact. Thus, systems science and positive psychology both have strengths and weaknesses, and we suggest that the synthesis of the two perspectives will create frameworks, tools, and applications that are greater than either perspective alone. Such an approach does not simply identify and address existing problems, but generates pathways toward yet unimagined futures.

Chairs
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:00pm - 4:30pm
ECCR 151

4:30pm

Complementarist Approach to Categorize Different Stakeholders within Socio-Technical Systems
2895 Socio-technical systems is a systems approach to understanding complex systems when interactions between humans and technology are dominant. Thus, the term socio-technical relates to the relationship between complex human activity systems and the technical infrastructure that governs the nature of the system. Socio-technical systems typically have multiple stakeholders, either in charge of systemic development, governing the system, or being affected (directly or indirectly) by it. Thus, in order to understand a socio-technical system, it is important to understand the different roles the stakeholders have within the system of interest. This research contributes in providing a complementarist and pluralist approach in recognizing the roles of stakeholders within socio-technical systems and categorizing them by introducing a formative taxonomy flexible for any socio-technical system, dependent on its context and purpose. Critical systems thinking and boundary critique are utilized as a foundation for categorizing stakeholders, while the onion model along with soft system methodology are used to delineate the stratified spheres of influence each stakeholder category has on the system. Even though, the obligations vary across the different systems context and purposes, the proposed flexible approach is expected to be beneficial to system thinkers and analysts in realization, recognition and categorization of stakeholders within socio-technical systems.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 200

4:30pm

Developing a Theory of Systems Change Approach to Practice-Based Research in a Professional Public Health Doctoral Program
2921 At the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, we are developing a distance learning doctoral program in public health (DrPH) focusing on adaptive leadership. Students complete dissertations, some explicitly using action research models, but all in support of the overarching program goal of developing practice based evidence for guiding systemic change. Core principles and skills embedded in our curriculum include systems thinking and systematic reflection. Dissertation research begins with building a problem statement for a “wicked” problem the student wishes to address, with associated initial action relevant broad research questions (how do we solve this problem?). We have required students to articulate their assumptions about what the problem is or might be and critically consider alternative ways of framing their problem statements, and have drawn from soft systems, systems dynamics, and Bob Williams’ syntheses of these and other systems traditions in doing so. As a next step, we require students to develop a conceptual framework and a visual representation of it that draws both from scholarly literature and from reflection on their practice experience. Identifying alternative ways of stating the problem does itself open up the exploration of more possibilities for solutions. Since, however, the ultimate goal of student scholarship is to contribute to solving a problem, not just stating it, developing the conceptual framework or model often involves describing a current state of affairs, selecting and specifying constructs or dimensions relevant to a description of this current state, as well as envisaging a more desirable future state and a pathway(s) to get to the future state from the current state. So there is a “theory of change,” or assumptions about what gets included in a description of the system, and how to get from point A to point B, that is at least implicit in the student’s model or conceptual framework, which we want to see made explicit. Furthermore, students need to develop, and operationalize (be able to apply to data collection and analysis) specific research questions investigating those pathways for change and/or refining the description of the current state. Thus far, not surprisingly, the results of research often include a re- or amended conceptualization of the model with which the student started, which can become the basis for action recommendations for change. In the more participatory action research options taken by some of the students, the student researcher is an active agent in those pathways for change, for instance acting as a developmental evaluator or facilitating community of practice discussions. In a “theory of change” approach one of the sources we draw from is evaluation methodology: evaluators from the Aspen Institute used the term in the 1990’s to discuss a participatory approach to evaluation that directed evaluators to facilitate discussions among stakeholders about what assumptions about how change happens they were bringing to a given intervention and, ideally, come to some consensus about this before finalizing a logic model for the intervention and relevant indicators. This has been further developed in evaluation circles via increasing critical attention paid to program logic and theory and intervention models. Another, more research-based approach to developing ‘theories of change,’ however, has to do with comparing the received ideas of the students as public health practitioners with what is supported in systems and social science literature. We would like to discuss with ISSS colleagues the implications of taking a “theory of change” approach to the development of conceptual frameworks and associated research questions as applied to the “wicked problems” our students select, and to that end will present some examples from our recent work with students.

Chairs
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 151

4:30pm

Five Elements Systemic Healthcare Program for Physically Strong Emotionally Happy Mentally Kind Behaviorally Charitable and Spiritually Enlightened – Reuniting Nature and Humanity 五行養生法之修身健康、修心受樂、慈悲養性、修行為善、正見靈修、以體現天人合一。
2882 Systemic wishes for the Chinese New Year is the blessing to each other in China in the beginning of each year. According to the Five Aggregate Human Mind system developed by Buddha, our minds are composed of five systems. Systemic Healthcare should be about balancing each one of these systems, and balancing between the systems. The ultimate goal is to live healthily so that we can work and play and achieve our tasks in life. In this paper, we try to classify the Traditional Chinese healthcare therapies according to these five aggregates to help human to become physically strong, emotionally happy, mentally kind, behaviorally charitable, and spiritually enlightened. The basic essentials in life include clothing, food, housing and transportation. In the Confucian classic, one of the disciples once said “Food and sex are basic instincts of human beings”. The desire for food ensures the physical survival of oneself, and the instinct on sexual desire makes sure the continuation of the family, clan and race. In order to have a stable flow, better basic essentials are required. They are usually related to the following four-character blessing phrases. These desires stimulate the research into efficient and effective methods for good survival and continuity, and part of the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Healthcare is about physical body healthcare. Here we will try to match it with the physical component of the Five Aggregate Human Mind System developed by Buddha. TCM healthcare can be divided into three different secret ingredients. The goal of emotional healthcare is to remain undisturbed by negative emotions thus falling into a vicious cycle. One should instead consistently concentrate on positive emotions, gradually and naturally resulting in the distillation of happy emotions and pleasant bodily sensations. Mental Healthcare aims to improve one’s habitual love and hate tendencies. We should eliminate feelings of jealousy for the rich and contempt for the poor. One should also forsake employing improper means purely to succeed. Nor should one selfishly seek pleasure at the expense of the feelings of others. In contrast we should develop our love towards the four pure characteristics in the teaching of Buddha, and relinquish the three evil toxic characteristics of human, namely craving, aversion and ignorance. The four pure characteristics can be simply understood as “unconditional love” towards others, mercy on the elderly and weak, sympathetic joy of sharing, and acceptance of the reality of life and human relations. Behavioral Healthcare is about our action, and we try to match it with the “Action Aggregate” of the Five Aggregate Human Mind system of the teaching of Buddha. Buddha divides the Action Aggregate into three different kinds, namely the bodily action, the verbal action and the mental intention action (brain wave? energy field?). The teachings of Buddha include: “Do not withhold an action because it will only do little good, and do not perform an action because it will only do little evil”. Therefore we should choose only charitable actions with goodwill. Only such actions could achieve the traditional Chinese wish of “Everyone embraced in one harmonious Qi”. The definition of being healthy by the World Health Organization, WHO, includes healthiness in three aspects, namely the physical, mental and “social”. Spiritual Healthcare is about the improvement of our in-born characteristics, possibly hidden in our physical DNA or our energetic “spirits” fields (Aura?). We now try to match this with the “Observation Aggregate” of the Five Aggregate Human Mind system in the teaching of Buddha. Here we must put our foundation in the fundamental teaching of Buddha in the “Four Nobel Truth”, guided especially by the “Right View” and “Right Thought” in the “Eight-Fold Nobel Path”, which is the fourth part of the Noble Truth.

Chairs
avatar for Thomas Wong

Thomas Wong

Founder, Researcher, Lecturer, clinical practitioner, Ancient Balance Medicine Research Institute
SIG Chair: Health and System Thinking SIG | | Bachelor of Engineering with First Class Honours in IT | Bachelor of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Master of Engineering in Telecommunication | Therapist of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deep Tissue pain therapy (1991-now) | Chair of Health and Systems Thinking SIG of ISSS (2008-now) | Liasion officer of C&W region, Auxiliary Medical Service HKSAR (2006-now) | Permanent Honorary President of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 265

4:30pm

Transnational Knowledge: Its Creation and Distribution Exploiting Entrepreneurship and Organisational Behaviour
2898 How can knowledge be created (incentivised) and distributed (shared socially) when it is what economists define as a public good - it is very expensive to produce, its use by any one person leaves no less for anyone else and it is generally difficult to sustain property rights over? In economic terms the marginal cost of distributing knowledge is zero and as marginal cost should equal price for optimality, price should be zero. Clearly if the price were zero there will be no incentive for anyone to produce it. So what is to be done? To charge for it on a per use basis is hard as it can be cheaply and costless transferred from one person to another. Despite this it is undoubtedly been made available in ever increasing quantities and quality. Universities were one traditional way of creating new knowledge in the public domain. These were supported out of general taxation or endowment and scholars working in them were expected to make their ideas available free to all who might be interested. Modern academic capitalism seeking to establish IPR in academically produced knowledge undermines that. These essence of creative advance in knowledge is that the ideas of all are available to all to do with what they will. If for commercial reasons sharing in this way may be undesirable and if it does not occur then a particular line of inquiry will be blocked of and in the longer term this could kill creativity.

Chairs
avatar for Louis Klein

Louis Klein

Consortial Partner & President, louis.klein@segroup.de
Vice President Conferences (2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences SIG Chair:    Systems Applications in Business and Industry SIG Chair:    Organizational Transformation and Social ChangeLouis Klein is an internationally recognized expert in the field of systemic change management. He is the founder of the Systemic Excellence Group and has been its CEO since 2001. Louis Klein holds a PhD in sociology. He is the chairman of... Read More →

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 1B55

4:30pm

Unlimited Energy
2900 “We are gods in human bodies” Continuing on the line of the previous two abstracts : “Science and Spirituality” and “Thrive Human Beings” (Fabiana Crespo, ISSS conferences 2014 and 2015), where were considered that the human being is composed by mind, body and spirit. And if the human being is aware of the vital energy that can create, redirect and transform, he not only can heal, nourish and empower himself but also can use this energy for his projects and aims. Deeper in this sense, focused this paper on the wisdom that is hidden for most people: “The Alquimia”, as it is named in sacred books. Quantum Physics, Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Sacred Geometry, Mathematics, Numerology, Biology, Neuroscience and many other disciplines inter and intra related give us the evidence that we are a kind of “Gods in Human Bodies”. That is to say, we are capable to create the same powerful energy to perform whatever we want (miracles as God, for those religious people) within our limited bodies. Most of us -meanwhile we don’t develop our consciousness-, use to think in a local linear way. And Quantum Physics shows that the atoms exists in more than one places. In other words, an atom is spread out all over the place, is only in a particular place if a conscious observer decides to look at it. Quantum Mechanics describes parallel universes, parallel electrons. So, why many of us are using a local linear way to relate ourself instead of a multidimensional one? On the other hand, the rate the world is changing nowadays is exponential because of the new technologies, that have exponential formats: digitalized, in the language of the computers. So, why not “digitalize” human beings multidimensional way of thinking? Imagine the human being as a computer. Our brain is like a radio, receives and emits electromagnetic waves, as bioelectrical pulse frequency hertz. An EEG -electroencephalogram- can show this. We are like WIFI systems, we can perform wireless transmissions all the time. And instead of being local linear thinkers we can begin thinking in a exponential format. We can think as complex multidimensional holographic entities. And digitalize our related thoughts so as to grow in an exponential way, for human beings. Like a conscious point within the whole, the human being etheric energy body can behave as an unlimited spherical consciousness dot. Aware of the whole within it. What do you think would be the impact of this exponentials formats to relate the human being with the Universe?

Chairs
AL

Alexander Laszlo

Buenos Aires Institute of Technology (ITBA)

Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 1B51

5:30pm

Refresh and Dinner
Please find attached an Area Restaurant List which details:


  • opening hours

  • location

  • and phone numbers.


We hope that you enjoy Boulder's eateries!
 

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences


Tuesday July 26, 2016 5:30pm - 6:45pm
Own Choice See attached PDF

7:00pm

Special Evening Colloquium: Edge of Science: thresholds and new paradigms.
Participatory, real-time science, or holistic science is the heart of the emerging new paradigm of sustainability science and anticipatory science. We can see it exemplified in science conducted during a crisis, which is quite different from disciplinary science in which we are used to knowing the questions and priorities for research. During crises even the questions must be discovered, disciplines must be combined or transcended, and people and institutions must collaborate. We will look at some characteristics of this exploratory edge of science that seems so important for the study of systems. We will also examine social and psychological factors that tend to resist exploratory science, making it difficult to study anomalous phenomena, crises or impending crises, and complex systems; and thus requiring a special set of personal skills. Today the challenge of complex systems places the greatest needs in science at that edge. This will be an evening of penetrating discussion on two topics (a) the need for an exploratory phase of science, (b) requisite human capacity for systems thinking and (c) peer and institutional resistance to threshold ideas and new paradigms. Chair: Dominique Surel and Pamela Henning

Speakers:


  • Gary Machlis - The distinctive Characteristics of Science During Crisis

  • Dominique Surel – Human Capacity for Systems Thinking

  • Pamela Buckle-Henning – Psychology of empowering and Supporting Student Research

  • Facilitated discussion


Chairs
avatar for Pamela Henning

Pamela Henning

Associate Professor of Management, Robert B. Willumstad School of Business
Pamela Buckle Henning is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work. Pamela’s scholarly and clinical work is oriented around the perspective that human psychology is a complex system... Read More →
avatar for Dominique Surel

Dominique Surel

Dominique@EnergyMedicineUniversity.org
Dr. Dominique Surel specialize in the development of Intuitive Intelligence. She has created a unique methodology to enhance accuracy of intuitive insights by integrating the natural human skill of intuition with components of Controlled Remote Viewing (CRV) and critical thinking. The result is a flexible decision-making tool that integrates our cognitive skills with accurate intuitive insights.

Speakers
avatar for Pamela Buckle-Henning

Pamela Buckle-Henning

Assistant Professor, Management, Marketing & Decision Sciences, Adelphi University
Secretary and Vice President for Protocol, International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Pamela Buckle Henning She is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work.Pamela’s scholarly... Read More →
avatar for Gary Machlis

Gary Machlis

co-Leader, USDOI Strategic Sciences Group
In September 2009, Gary Machlis was appointed the first Science Advisor to the Director for the National Park Service. He is playing a key role in advancing science within the NPS, advising the NPS director on science policy and programs, and working with the Department of the Interior leadership, NPS managers and stakeholders as well as the scientific community. Machlis received his B.S. and M.S. in forestry at the University of Washington... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Benson 180

7:15pm

Gary Machlis: The distinctive Characteristics of Science During Crisis
Chairs
avatar for Pamela Henning

Pamela Henning

Associate Professor of Management, Robert B. Willumstad School of Business
Pamela Buckle Henning is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work. Pamela’s scholarly and clinical work is oriented around the perspective that human psychology is a complex system... Read More →
avatar for Dominique Surel

Dominique Surel

Dominique@EnergyMedicineUniversity.org
Dr. Dominique Surel specialize in the development of Intuitive Intelligence. She has created a unique methodology to enhance accuracy of intuitive insights by integrating the natural human skill of intuition with components of Controlled Remote Viewing (CRV) and critical thinking. The result is a flexible decision-making tool that integrates our cognitive skills with accurate intuitive insights.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 7:15pm - 7:45pm
Benson 180

7:45pm

Dominique Surel: Human Capacity for Systems Thinking
Chairs
avatar for Pamela Henning

Pamela Henning

Associate Professor of Management, Robert B. Willumstad School of Business
Pamela Buckle Henning is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work. Pamela’s scholarly and clinical work is oriented around the perspective that human psychology is a complex system... Read More →
avatar for Dominique Surel

Dominique Surel

Dominique@EnergyMedicineUniversity.org
Dr. Dominique Surel specialize in the development of Intuitive Intelligence. She has created a unique methodology to enhance accuracy of intuitive insights by integrating the natural human skill of intuition with components of Controlled Remote Viewing (CRV) and critical thinking. The result is a flexible decision-making tool that integrates our cognitive skills with accurate intuitive insights.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 7:45pm - 8:00pm
Benson 180

8:00pm

Pamela Henning: Psychology of empowering and Supporting Student Research
Chairs
avatar for Pamela Henning

Pamela Henning

Associate Professor of Management, Robert B. Willumstad School of Business
Pamela Buckle Henning is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work. Pamela’s scholarly and clinical work is oriented around the perspective that human psychology is a complex system... Read More →
avatar for Dominique Surel

Dominique Surel

Dominique@EnergyMedicineUniversity.org
Dr. Dominique Surel specialize in the development of Intuitive Intelligence. She has created a unique methodology to enhance accuracy of intuitive insights by integrating the natural human skill of intuition with components of Controlled Remote Viewing (CRV) and critical thinking. The result is a flexible decision-making tool that integrates our cognitive skills with accurate intuitive insights.

Tuesday July 26, 2016 8:00pm - 8:15pm
Benson 180

8:15pm

Facilitated Discussion
Speakers
avatar for Pamela Henning

Pamela Henning

Associate Professor of Management, Robert B. Willumstad School of Business
Pamela Buckle Henning is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work. Pamela’s scholarly and clinical work is oriented around the perspective that human psychology is a complex system... Read More →
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →
avatar for Gary Machlis

Gary Machlis

co-Leader, USDOI Strategic Sciences Group
In September 2009, Gary Machlis was appointed the first Science Advisor to the Director for the National Park Service. He is playing a key role in advancing science within the NPS, advising the NPS director on science policy and programs, and working with the Department of the Interior leadership, NPS managers and stakeholders as well as the scientific community. Machlis received his B.S. and M.S. in forestry at the University of Washington... Read More →
avatar for Dominique Surel

Dominique Surel

Dominique@EnergyMedicineUniversity.org
Dr. Dominique Surel specialize in the development of Intuitive Intelligence. She has created a unique methodology to enhance accuracy of intuitive insights by integrating the natural human skill of intuition with components of Controlled Remote Viewing (CRV) and critical thinking. The result is a flexible decision-making tool that integrates our cognitive skills with accurate intuitive insights.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 8:15pm - 9:00pm
Benson 180
 
Wednesday, July 27
 

7:00am

Breakfast
C4C Meal Cards

Sponsors & Partners
avatar for ISSS

ISSS

International Society for the Systems Sciences



Wednesday July 27, 2016 7:00am - 8:30am
Centre for Community Dining Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

7:15am

ISSS2016 Roundtable Reflection
Limited Capacity seats available

Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 7:15am - 8:15am
Centre for Community (C4C) TreeHouse Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

8:29am

Plenary V: Making Sense In Economics, Ethics, and Policy
Description: We need to examine the foundation of our global economic system that assumes unlimited growth in a finite world, to consider the paradigms of regenerative capital, steady-state economics, and innovation. This means considering no-growth and negative-growth models, and perhaps shifting our concept of growth from quantity to quality, from extraction to investment in natural and human capital.

Chair: Alec Tsoucatos and Mila Popovitch

Speakers
avatar for John Fullerton

John Fullerton

Founder and President, The Capital Institute
John Fullerton is the Founder and President of Capital Institute, “a collaborative working to explore and effect the economic transition to a more just, regenerative, and thus sustainable way of living on this earth through the transformation of finance.” Through the work of Capital Institute, regular public speaking engagements, and university lectures, John has become a recognized thought leader in the New Economy space generally, and the... Read More →
avatar for Mila Popovitch

Mila Popovitch

Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher, University of Colorado
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder | Mila Popovich is an interdisciplinary scholar, an awarded performing artist in multiple dance forms, and a bilingual poet. With expertise in Comparative Literature and Humanities ,her current work focuses on the issues of woman’s migrations and migrant women's subjectivity in relation to globalization processes. | | She is an Associate Fellow at the World... Read More →
avatar for Alec Tsoucatos

Alec Tsoucatos

Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University
Alec Tsoucatos, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt on December 6 1941 (a day before Pearl Harbor) of Greek parents. Alexandria then was a cosmopolitan city that embraced English, French, Italian, Greek, Jewish and Arab communities. Alec went to an English school for his primary education and in Athens to a Greek school for Junior and Senior high school... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 8:29am - 8:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

8:30am

John Fullerton: Reimagining Capitalism - Transitioning to a Regenerative Economy
The Earth is full of Economies and the Earth is a system that is not growing in size, therefore what the Earth contains cannot grow indefinitely without harming another part.  We must discover therefore, other kinds of economic systems that do not have growth as the primary goal. The “engineering constraints” must be non-growing economies that nevertheless provide for human and non-human wellbeing. What sources can we find for inspiration and insight to travel this very new, exhilarating and formidable trail?  What are the consequences for teaching economics and policy recommendations?

Speakers
avatar for Alec Tsoucatos

Alec Tsoucatos

Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University
Alec Tsoucatos, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt on December 6 1941 (a day before Pearl Harbor) of Greek parents. Alexandria then was a cosmopolitan city that embraced English, French, Italian, Greek, Jewish and Arab communities. Alec went to an English school for his primary education and in Athens to a Greek school for Junior and Senior high school... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:00am

Alec Tsoucatos: The Economics of Care, Wisdom and Empowerment
Speakers
avatar for Mila Popovitch

Mila Popovitch

Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher, University of Colorado
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder | Mila Popovich is an interdisciplinary scholar, an awarded performing artist in multiple dance forms, and a bilingual poet. With expertise in Comparative Literature and Humanities ,her current work focuses on the issues of woman’s migrations and migrant women's subjectivity in relation to globalization processes. | | She is an Associate Fellow at the World... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 9:00am - 9:15am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:15am

Mila Popovitch: Economics of Dignity and New Economy - Valuing Planet, People and Progress
Speakers
avatar for John Fullerton

John Fullerton

Founder and President, The Capital Institute
John Fullerton is the Founder and President of Capital Institute, “a collaborative working to explore and effect the economic transition to a more just, regenerative, and thus sustainable way of living on this earth through the transformation of finance.” Through the work of Capital Institute, regular public speaking engagements, and university lectures, John has become a recognized thought leader in the New Economy space generally, and the... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 9:15am - 9:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:30am

Plenary V: Panel Discussion
Chairs
avatar for Mila Popovitch

Mila Popovitch

Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher, University of Colorado
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder | Mila Popovich is an interdisciplinary scholar, an awarded performing artist in multiple dance forms, and a bilingual poet. With expertise in Comparative Literature and Humanities ,her current work focuses on the issues of woman’s migrations and migrant women's subjectivity in relation to globalization processes. | | She is an Associate Fellow at the World... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for John Fullerton

John Fullerton

Founder and President, The Capital Institute
John Fullerton is the Founder and President of Capital Institute, “a collaborative working to explore and effect the economic transition to a more just, regenerative, and thus sustainable way of living on this earth through the transformation of finance.” Through the work of Capital Institute, regular public speaking engagements, and university lectures, John has become a recognized thought leader in the New Economy space generally, and the... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Kucinich

Elizabeth Kucinich

Consultant, elizabeth@elizabethkucinich.com
Prof. Elizabeth Kucinich is an independent trans-Atlantic organizational development, campaigns and government affairs consultant based in Washington, D.C. Drawing from her extensive experience working inside the U.S. political system, paired with a sincere desire and international reputation for working to bring social, economic, health, agricultural and ecological systems into balance, Elizabeth works to strengthen the... Read More →
avatar for Gunter Pauli

Gunter Pauli

Director and Chief Technology Officer, Blue Economy Holdings, Inc.
Gunter Pauli (1956) graduated as an economist with an MBA ant then established ten companies of which two failed. He has never had a job and has always worked independently. Inspired by Aurelio Peccei, the founder of the Club of Rome, he set out to pioneer and be the change he wanted to see in the world. His endeavors cover business, culture, science and education. He co-authored a book with Fritjof Capra that was the first book ever presented on... Read More →
avatar for Alec Tsoucatos

Alec Tsoucatos

Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University
Alec Tsoucatos, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt on December 6 1941 (a day before Pearl Harbor) of Greek parents. Alexandria then was a cosmopolitan city that embraced English, French, Italian, Greek, Jewish and Arab communities. Alec went to an English school for his primary education and in Athens to a Greek school for Junior and Senior high school... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 9:30am - 10:15am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:15am

Morning Break
Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:15am - 10:30am
MATH Courtyard Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:29am

Plenary VI: Multi-Cultural Worldviews on Sustainability
Description: We need to examine the foundation of our global economic system that assumes unlimited growth in a finite world, to consider the paradigms of regenerative capital, steady-state economics, and innovation. This means considering no-growth and negative-growth models, and perhaps shifting our concept of growth from quantity to quality, from extraction to investment in natural and human capital.

Chair: Alec Tsoucatos and Mila Popovitch

Speakers
avatar for John Fullerton

John Fullerton

Founder and President, The Capital Institute
John Fullerton is the Founder and President of Capital Institute, “a collaborative working to explore and effect the economic transition to a more just, regenerative, and thus sustainable way of living on this earth through the transformation of finance.” Through the work of Capital Institute, regular public speaking engagements, and university lectures, John has become a recognized thought leader in the New Economy space generally, and the... Read More →
avatar for Mila Popovitch

Mila Popovitch

Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher, University of Colorado
Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder | Mila Popovich is an interdisciplinary scholar, an awarded performing artist in multiple dance forms, and a bilingual poet. With expertise in Comparative Literature and Humanities ,her current work focuses on the issues of woman’s migrations and migrant women's subjectivity in relation to globalization processes. | | She is an Associate Fellow at the World... Read More →
avatar for Alec Tsoucatos

Alec Tsoucatos

Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University
Alec Tsoucatos, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt on December 6 1941 (a day before Pearl Harbor) of Greek parents. Alexandria then was a cosmopolitan city that embraced English, French, Italian, Greek, Jewish and Arab communities. Alec went to an English school for his primary education and in Athens to a Greek school for Junior and Senior high school... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:29am - 10:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:29am

Plenary VI: Multi-Cultural Worldviews on Sustainability
Ancient and native cultures have a direct experiential knowledge of whole systems and what is a sustainable natural balance. What are the lessons and how do we incorporate them into modern science, leadership, and society?

Chairs
avatar for Vijay Gupta

Vijay Gupta

Professor Emeritus, University of Colorado Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences
Vijay K. Gupta is a professor emeritus in the Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, and is a fellow emeritus of the Cooperative Institute For Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado. Vijay has widely published in major research journals in hydrologic and atmospheric sciences, applied mathematics, probability theory, and nonlinear processes in geophysics. Soon after completing... Read More →
avatar for Dominique Surel

Dominique Surel

Dominique@EnergyMedicineUniversity.org
Dr. Dominique Surel specialize in the development of Intuitive Intelligence. She has created a unique methodology to enhance accuracy of intuitive insights by integrating the natural human skill of intuition with components of Controlled Remote Viewing (CRV) and critical thinking. The result is a flexible decision-making tool that integrates our cognitive skills with accurate intuitive insights.

Speakers
avatar for David Begay

David Begay

Associate Research Professor, University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy
David Begay, Ph.D., is a member of the Navajo Nation. He received his B.A.and M.A. from the University of Arizona, Tucson, in Political Science with a concentration in Policy Analysis and Indian Policy and Law Studies. He received his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, CA, witha concentration in Indigenous Science Education and Application of TraditionalKnowledge. David is Adjunct faculty at NAU, Flagstaff, in... Read More →
avatar for Greg Cajete

Greg Cajete

NAS Chair, Associate Professor Education, University of New Mexico
Gregory Cajete, Native American educator whose work is dedicated to honoring the foundations of indigenous knowledge in education. Dr. Cajete is a Tewa Indian from Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico. He has served as a New Mexico Humanities scholar in ethno botany of Northern New Mexico and as a member of the New Mexico Arts Commission. In addition, he has lectured at colleges and universities in the U.S. , Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, England... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Maraboy

Nancy Maraboy

President and Founder, Indigenous Education Institute
Nancy C. Maryboy, Ph.D. is the President and Founder of the Indigenous Education Institute, a non profit organization with a mission of preserving, protecting and applying indigenous knowledge. She is also President of Wohali Productions, Inc., consulting in areas of indigenous science, indigenous astronomy, Native American education, curriculum development, film making and strategic planning.
avatar for Jamal Martin

Jamal Martin

Professor, University of New Mexico, Africana Studies
J.E. Jamal Martín, born in Norfolk in 1954, educated at the New School for Social Research, completed his undergraduate degree at Hawaii Pacific College and graduate degree at the University of Hawaii’i at Manoa with postgraduate work at the University of Michigan. He has conducted interdisciplinary research, taught and practiced in local, national and global settings in nursing, medicine and international health. He joined the faculty of... Read More →
avatar for Rudy Miick

Rudy Miick

Founder and Head Facilitator, Leadership in the Fall Line
Rudy Miick is founder and head facilitator of Leadership in the Fall Line. His expertise comes from 30+ years of leading his own company, coaching leaders and building high performing companies. His client roster includes over 1,500 successful projects beginning in the fast paced volatile world of restaurants, hotels and resort. In the last 12 years his client list includes manufacturers, retail, health & fitness, martial arts and the... Read More →
avatar for Bruce Milne

Bruce Milne

W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Environmental and Food Systems, bmilne@sevilleta.unm.edu
Bruce T. Milne holds the W.K. Kellogg Endowed Chair in Sustainable Environmental and Food Systems and is Professor of Biology at the University of New Mexico. He specializes in landscape ecology, fractal geometry, and scaling in complex systems.  | He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the State University of New York at Albany, Ph.D. from Rutgers, and was a lecturer in ecology at Harvard Graduate School of Design. The International... Read More →



Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:29am - 10:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

12:25pm

Special Box Lunch Keynote: Inter-Faith Perspectives on Global Sustainability
In the face of unprecedented global change, Pope Francis recently challenged people of all faiths to unite together for what he called "integral ecology." Is his appeal compelling? What of a similar nature has been said in other faith traditions and what is new about this appeal? This interfaith panel discussion on global sustainability will explore a variety of faith perspectives that may contrast or correlate with the Pope's Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home. Scholars and religious leaders representing diverse faith traditions will engage with one another to discuss the roots and meanings of "integral ecology" and this contemporary call to action.

Chairs
avatar for Andrew Schwartz

Andrew Schwartz

Managing Director, Center for Process Studies
Andrew Schwartz is a Ph.D. candidate in Philosophy of Religion and Theology at Claremont Graduate University. He received his B.A. in Religion from Northwest Nazarene University (where he studied with Thomas Jay Oord), an M.A. in Theological Studies from Nazarene Theological Seminary, and an M.A. in Philosophy at Claremont Graduate University. Andrew's primary academic interests include Comparative Philosophy/Theology, Pluralism, Truth and... Read More →
avatar for Alec Tsoucatos

Alec Tsoucatos

Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University
Alec Tsoucatos, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt on December 6 1941 (a day before Pearl Harbor) of Greek parents. Alexandria then was a cosmopolitan city that embraced English, French, Italian, Greek, Jewish and Arab communities. Alec went to an English school for his primary education and in Athens to a Greek school for Junior and Senior high school... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Aun Ali

Aun Ali

Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies, University of Colorado
Aun Hasan Ali is the Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Colorado. He joined the Department of Religious Studies in 2015. He works on the Islamic tradition. Ali studied Religion and Philosophy at Rutgers University, receiving his BA in 2003. That same year he travelled to Yemen to continue studying Arabic. He earned an MA in Islamic Studies from McGill University in 2007, and will receive his PhD in Islamic Studies from... Read More →
avatar for Loriliai Biernacki

Loriliai Biernacki

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, University of Colorado, Religious Studies
Loriliai Biernacki (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania) is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Religious Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interests include Hinduism, the interface between religion and science, and gender. Her first book, Renowned Goddess of Desire: Women, Sex and Speech in Tantra (Oxford, 2007) won the Kayden Award in 2008. She is co-editor of God’s... Read More →
avatar for Venugopal Damerla

Venugopal Damerla

Physician, United States Department of Veterans Health Affairs
Venugopal is a practicing Physician with the United States Department of Veterans Health Affairs in Denver. He was born and raised in Secunderabad, India. Over the last 25 years Venugopal has studied Vedic spirituality under the guidance of disciples of A.C.Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, a world renowned exponent on Bhakti Yoga. He has taught the Vedic Science of Yoga since 1992 in India and the US. Damerla... Read More →
avatar for Glenn Morris

Glenn Morris

Associate Professor and President's Teaching Scholar, University of Colorado, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Glenn T. Morris is the Associate Professor and President's Teaching Scholar of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Colorado. Professor Morris' areas of expertise are indigenous peoples in the international legal and political arena, public law, civil liberties, and race/gender and the law. He has been active in the development of international legal standards for the defense of the rights of indigenous peoples for over... Read More →
avatar for Anne Parker

Anne Parker

Professor Environmental Studies, Naropa University
Anne Parker is passionate about serving life and renewing our connection to and deep reverence for the Earth in her teaching and life work. She is a Professor of Environmental Studies, a full time Naropa University faculty member who has taught in both the BA in Environmental Studies and MA in Environmental Leadership since 1996. She grew up in the Bay Area of California, in love with her costal habitat and with the Sierra Nevada where she... Read More →
avatar for Marc Soloway

Marc Soloway

Rabbi, Bonai Shalom
Rabbi Marc Soloway has been Bonai Shalom’s rabbi in Boulder, Colorado since his 2004 ordination from Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies in California. Previously he was an actor and complementary medicine practitioner in London. He chairs Hazon’s Rabbinical Advisory Board, was part of a 2012 rabbis’ delegation to Ghana with AJWS, is a graduate of the Institute of Jewish Spirituality and a board member of Ramah of the... Read More →
avatar for Todd Wynward

Todd Wynward

Author of Rewilding the Way: Break Free to Follow an Untamed God, Wilderness Educator
Todd Wynward is a wilderness educator and author of Rewilding the Way: Break Free to Follow an Untamed God. Todd lives with his family in Taos, NM. When he is not re-imagining Christianity, Wynward is re-imagining public education and the American way of life, starting with his own. Locally he practices homesteading in the high desert, while nationally he works to galvanize movements in watershed discipleship, bioregional food... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 12:25pm - 1:25pm
University Memorial Centre (UMC), Room 235 University Memorial Centre (UMC), University of Colorado

1:30pm

Policy Summit: Systemic Sustainability Policy – Recommendations of the Systems Sciences Community
2964 Systemic Sustainability Policy – Recommendations of the Systems Sciences Community

Chairs
PS

Paul Sperry

pdsperry@gmail.com
avatar for Alec Tsoucatos

Alec Tsoucatos

Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University
Alec Tsoucatos, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt on December 6 1941 (a day before Pearl Harbor) of Greek parents. Alexandria then was a cosmopolitan city that embraced English, French, Italian, Greek, Jewish and Arab communities. Alec went to an English school for his primary education and in Athens to a Greek school for Junior and Senior high school... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Benson 180

1:30pm

Workshop: Anticipatory Systems and Gender Dysphoria
2949  What is it like to be Trans-Gendered? Is it easier to comprehend through the Anticipatory Systems Lens of Robert Rosen's scientific work?In this dual presentation, we will explore these ideas and hopefully arrive at a much clearer understanding of what Gender Dysphoria is like to live with as well as a greater comprehension of what causes it, from a model-based, model-guided Systems Science perspective.Donna Rosen is a trans-gendered woman who has already undergone the process of transition and surgery that is currently the standard of medical care in the United States. She has written a book about her experiences and will share what it's like at the age of 3 to realize you are stuck in a strange situation that other people cannot see but you can't tell anybody about it, either.Judith Rosen will discuss Anticipatory Systems Theory and show how the human mind and body represent an evolutionary development as a dual-Anticipatory System in one living organism. The interaction between mental models and somatic models can often be dysfunctional, particularly when they are each defining the “self” in conflicting ways. Gender Dysphoria is precisely that situation.

Chairs
DR

Donna Rosen

Rosen Enterprises
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 1B51

1:30pm

Workshop: Developing Capability using a Maturity Profile for Action Research: An International Collaboration
Background: Borne of the practical turn in social science epistemology, action research typically espouses claims of personal, team, organizational, and community improvement/ transformation. It is also widely promoted as an effective framework of empowerment and emancipation to improve a social situation or condition (Reason & Bradbury, 2008; Stringer, 2007): an intent which appeals to leaders wishing to create improvement, particularly in low socio-economic and disadvantaged communities (Sankaran 2016). Validity of such espousals has been substantially unexplored, and where evaluations have occurred they have been focused more on process than impact. A group of international researchers are engaged in an evaluative study of over 100 action research initiatives (ESAR study) using a variety of methods, tools and conceptual frameworks. The Maturity Model is one of the conceptual frameworks adopted in the ESAR study. 
Maturity models have their origins in the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) developed through research to address the poor performance of software projects delivered to the US department of defence in the 1980’s. The purpose of the CMM model was to help contractors increase capability to improve their software engineering processes from an ad-hoc state to more formal and repeatable state and eventually to optimise the processes to be able to deliver consistent outcomes. Maturity models have found their way into many other organisational contexts such as project management, knowledge management, process management, research capability and even for information systems action research project management.
A typical maturity model consists of a sequence of levels that form a path to follow to move from an initial to an advance stage of maturity. These models help organisations to evaluate their current level of maturity of a process and set goals to move towards a higher maturity level.
While maturity models often use ‘business speak’ in their definition and terms used to describe  levels of maturity the authors feel that they can be made palatable and useful to action researchers to improve the ways in which they can manage their projects to deliver sustainable outcomes. This resulted in the development of the maturity profile.
The international ESAR research team have developed a framework of process and outcome indicators to represent stages of implementation and accomplishment for AR initiatives.  Data from pilot case studies were used to develop a maturity profile for AR initiatives, representing levels of maturity and evaluative outcomes at different stages of a project.  A questionnaire has also been developed for key attributes of a maturity profile that will be used at the proposed workshop to be validated and trialled by action researchers..The proposed workshop will be conducted using a ‘World Café’ format with the following schedule (Overall 90 minutes)
• Welcome and Introductions (10 minutes)• Welcome to the workshop –• Key Question to discuss today• Introduction of the facilitators• Allocation of participants to tables• Introduction to the process – (5 minutes)• World Café Rounds (50 minutes)• Break (10 minutes)• Prioritization (15 minutes)• Close 
The results from this workshop will be compared with similar workshop s that were held at the ALARA World Congress held in Pretoria in November 2015 and a workshop proposed at the next ALARA World Congress being held in November 2016 held in Adelaide.
The data from the three workshops will be analyzed and submitted as a journal paper by the authors in Systemic Practice and Action Research.

References:
Reason, P. & Bradbury, H. (EDs.) 2008. The SAGE handbook of action research, 2nd. ed., London: Sage.
Sankaran, S. (in press). Taking action using systems research. In M. C. Edson, P. Buckle Henning, & S. Sankaran (Eds.), A guide to systems research: Philosophy, processes and practice. Singapore: Springer.
Stringer, E. T. (2013). Action research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage

Chairs
avatar for Pamela Buckle-Henning

Pamela Buckle-Henning

Assistant Professor, Management, Marketing & Decision Sciences, Adelphi University
Secretary and Vice President for Protocol, International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Pamela Buckle Henning She is an Associate Professor of Management at the Robert B. Willumstad School of Business at Adelphi University in New York. As a management educator in the United States, she teaches organizational behavior, leadership, teamwork and group dynamics, and supervises student thesis and independent study work.Pamela’s scholarly... Read More →
avatar for Shankar Sankaran

Shankar Sankaran

Professor, School of the Built Environment, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences. | IG Chair: Action ResearchSIG | | Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on Megaprojects . He teaches project management at post-graduate level, in particular, Systems Thinking for Managers; Negotiation and Conflict Management; and governance and... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 265

1:30pm

Workshop: System Literacy and Systemic Innovation for Thrivable Future
2937 System Literacy and Systemic Innovation for Thrivable Future 

Chairs
avatar for Pavel Luksha

Pavel Luksha

Professor, pavel.luksha@gmail.com
Dr. Pavel Luksha said the following about Kinematic Self­Replicating Machines The book provides a relatively good review on theory of self­reproduction. I found the book a very comprehensive study on possible designs of kinematic self­replicators. One thing the book has successfully shown is that these designs, at least those theoretical, are vast. The book is without a doubt a compendium of projects for artificial... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 200

1:30pm

Workshop: WILD: Wilderness Integration & Life Development. Co-creating the Emerging Model
2783   This workshop will expand upon the content and ideas provided in the earlier session: Outdoor Adolescent Rites of Passages: Theoretical Foundations, Contemporary Shortcomings, and the Emerging New Model. Participants will be engaged by exploring personal connections to the outdoors and meaningful experiences they have had in the wilderness. A practical and working model of a community-based outdoor youth engagement initiative will then be presented. Participants will be asked to contribute to the development of this model through critical feedback, generative dialogue, and human-centered design. Participants will leave the workshop with a deeper understanding of how outdoor rites of passage can be offered in any community, as well as having contributed to the development of a practical initiative in Colorado.

Chairs
avatar for Eric Dooley-Feldman

Eric Dooley-Feldman

Program Manager, JUMP! Foundation
Eric Dooley-Feldman has worked as an outdoor guide, counselor, coach, and educator throughout the world. After graduating from Connecticut College with a Bachelors degree in Anthropology in 2009, he moved to Wyoming to pursue a passion for outdoor adventure and exploration. Since then, Eric has served as a Naturalist throughout the National Parks and Forests of California, an adventure guide for students in Costa Rica, a community service and... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 1:30pm - 3:00pm
ECCR 245

1:30pm

Group 1 Field Trip 1:30-3:15pm - NCAR / Mesa Trail
Limited Capacity seats available

NCAR is an NSF research facility that studies the global environment and is open to the Public. It is situated next to the Boulder Mountain Park and Mesa Trail. NCAR staff will greet each group and give a short talk about NCAR outside in the natural setting of the Mesa. Visitors are then free to browse the exhibits or walk along the Mesa trail. 30 persons in each Group; signup at Registration Desk.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 1:30pm - 3:15pm
University Memorial Centre

3:00pm

Group 2 Field Trip 3:00-4:45pm - NCAR / Mesa Trail
Limited Capacity seats available

NCAR is an NSF research facility that studies the global environment and is open to the Public. It is situated next to the Boulder Mountain Park and Mesa Trail. NCAR staff will greet each group and give a short talk about NCAR outside in the natural setting of the Mesa. Visitors are then free to browse the exhibits or walk along the Mesa trail. 30 persons in each Group; signup at Registration Desk.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:00pm - 4:45pm
Benson/Math

3:30pm

System Wholeness and Unity In Diversity within ISSS
2905 System thinking is about seeing things as a whole, as unity. However the seeing could happen from different points of view according to their corresponding perspectives. As a result, there is a diversity of system thinking. This diversity provides the foundation to unite the different perspectives in order to advance to the next level of system thinking, the special systemic properties of the observers and decision makers. In this discussion panel, we present the Health and System Thinking from different perspectives, both theoretical and clinical, both microscopic and macroscopic, as well as both Eastern and Western. These include system thinking from Energy medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Indian Ayurvedic Medicine, Micro-systemic environment of cancer cells, and Mathematical systemic view of acupuncture
 Coordinators: 1. Traditional Chinese Medicine: Thomas WONG 2. Energy medicine: Dr Dominique Surel https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-dominique-surel-2a081b
 Invited practitioners for in person or on video discussion: 1. Indian Ayurvedic Medicine by Dr. Shim 2. Micro-systemic environment of cancer cells by Gary Smith https://uk.linkedin.com/in/gary-smith-5338aa4 3. Mathematical systemic view of acupuncture by Kent Palmer https://www.linkedin.com/in/kent-palmer-95bb767

Each speaker will have a 5-10min talk about their work relating to health and system thinking. Then we will have discussions and questions concentrating on the theme of how “Unity in Diversity” may apply.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:30pm - Thursday July 21, 2016 5:00pm
ECCR 265

3:30pm

Policy Summit: Systemic Sustainability Policy – Recommendations of the Systems Sciences Community
2964 Systemic Sustainability Policy – Recommendations of the Systems Sciences Community

Chairs
PS

Paul Sperry

pdsperry@gmail.com
avatar for Alec Tsoucatos

Alec Tsoucatos

Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University
Alec Tsoucatos, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, Economics and Business, Regis University and Metro State University. He was born in Alexandria, Egypt on December 6 1941 (a day before Pearl Harbor) of Greek parents. Alexandria then was a cosmopolitan city that embraced English, French, Italian, Greek, Jewish and Arab communities. Alec went to an English school for his primary education and in Athens to a Greek school for Junior and Senior high school... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Benson 180

3:30pm

Workshop: Anticipatory Systems and Gender Dysphoria
2949  What is it like to be Trans-Gendered? Is it easier to comprehend through the Anticipatory Systems Lens of Robert Rosen's scientific work?In this dual presentation, we will explore these ideas and hopefully arrive at a much clearer understanding of what Gender Dysphoria is like to live with as well as a greater comprehension of what causes it, from a model-based, model-guided Systems Science perspective.Donna Rosen is a trans-gendered woman who has already undergone the process of transition and surgery that is currently the standard of medical care in the United States. She has written a book about her experiences and will share what it's like at the age of 3 to realize you are stuck in a strange situation that other people cannot see but you can't tell anybody about it, either.Judith Rosen will discuss Anticipatory Systems Theory and show how the human mind and body represent an evolutionary development as a dual-Anticipatory System in one living organism. The interaction between mental models and somatic models can often be dysfunctional, particularly when they are each defining the “self” in conflicting ways. Gender Dysphoria is precisely that situation.

Chairs
DR

Donna Rosen

Rosen Enterprises
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 1B51

3:30pm

Workshop: CET SIG Workshop: Collaboration for Impact 2016
2946  Systems Literacy is a coordinated ongoing effort to create a greater awareness and understanding about “Systems” in society, schools and universities and engineering and to develop a comprehensive set of big ideas, supporting concepts and learning progressions. This Plenary is an invitation to join this initiative throughout the conference and beyond.

The presentation will describe the work completed in the past 12 months since this project began at last year’s ISSS Annual conference in Berlin 2015. The International Society for Systems Sciences is partnered with the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR) to develop Systems Literacy. In 2000 work began at the National Geographic to encourage geographic literacy. This work progressed with the support of U.S. Government agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Interior and many varied not for profit and educational organizations, to embrace projects on ocean literacy, earth science literacy, atmospheric literacy, climate literacy and energy literacy. These subject areas are a good foundation and models for exploring how Systems Literacy can be a path towards realizing sustainable futures.  The specific case of the Ocean Literacy project will be described as a model for Systems Literacy.  It was started in 2004 and has now influenced US Ocean Policy, the development of the recently published Next Generation Science Standards and now European Union sponsored projects on ocean literacy in Europe. A similar aspiration and challenge for Systems Literacy will be described. Connections to other conference plenaries and the themes of this conference will be made. Learning opportunities and ways to contribute will be outlined. A look forward to Plenary X will be made with the intent of building a richer picture of the Systems Literacy project development possibilities and plans by the Friday of the conference. 

Chairs
avatar for Dino Karabeg

Dino Karabeg

dino@ifi.uio.no
Global issues such as the climate change, or the 'world problematique' as the Club of Rome called them, call for new ways of thinking and acting. Results in physics and cognitive science challenge the foundations on which the academic tradition has developed. Information technology allows us to organize the production and distribution of knowledge in completely new ways. In these circumstances a new academic frontier opens up, where we are called... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 200

3:30pm

Workshop: Network Thinking and Liberating Practice for Creating Resilient, Diverse, Communities of Practice that Engage the Whole Person
2784  The workshop develops a network thinking lens then builds inter-organizational networking capacity with participants using Network Weaving principles and processes (Holley, 2010). Participants interact using Liberating Structures (Lipmanowicz & McCandless, 2014) to build relationships in the session and unleash collective intelligence to form inclusive networks of diverse stakeholders. An exercise makes the group’s structure visible first on butcher paper and then modeled in a free on-line network mapping tool (Kumu). An appreciation of the power of network thinking is developed. Techniques for building action-oriented, intentional, relationship-rich, and supportive networks can be applied to participant’s respective domain practices. Facilitated structures that achieve surprisingly good group engagement are easily adopted upon returning to participant home organizations. And we have fun!
This highly participatory workshop addresses the challenge of sustainability in human collectives working for change together by harnessing their diversity through intentional and systematic relationship building.  It uses information technology to make relationship structure visible (Kumu). It uses a “social technology of discourse” (Liberating Structures) to engage the active intelligence and diversity of every participant to build a social structure (Community of Practice) that can affect change through harnessing and coordinating their common intention.

Participants learn and take away:
1. A network thinking lens• Use a network thinking lens to engage differently in organizations • Use Network Weaving principles to begin to build out intentional networks for action• Holley, J. (2012). Network weaver handbook: A guide to transformational networks. Network Weaver Publishing
2. Use Liberating Structures to enable surprisingly good outcomes for groups• Learn the Liberating Structure called “1-2-4-all” to enhance the generative potential of any meeting• Learn the Liberating Structure “Social Network Webbing” so face-to-face groups visualize their networks• Capture the value diversity brings through full participation; encourage every voice• Lipmanowicz, H., & McCandless, K. (2014). The surprising power of liberating structures: Simple rules to unleash a culture of innovation.
3. Connect with people doing similar work, create Communities of Practice• Use Kumu to capture and model those relationships• Get support from like-minded network builders in the session when we return to our practices• https://kumu.ioParticipants discuss how and why building intentional networks based on strong, supportive relationships result in action. We’ll demonstrate Network Weaving concepts and methods applied to organizational networks. We’ll make networks visible by actually capturing and modeling the network of participants. Using Liberating Structures that hold both the individual and collective in the session enables participants to try them in their practices. Participants leave with new perspectives, increased skills in facilitating conversations, and accessible demonstrations of simple tools that support ongoing organizing.

The session is a micro-iteration of a participatory action research cycle. By observing, thinking, acting, and reflecting, the participants move together through cognitive and behavioral transformation about network thinking. The session uses a series of generative and participatory interactions (Liberating Structures) to engage people to learn and build a Community of Practice (CoP) for thinking from a network perspective and for building effective networks. The community structure is modeled in a tool (Kumu) that will allow participants to easily access each other after the session and use the tool to model their own native relationship and intentional networks.Impact? Effective large-scale collaborative relationship building and network thinking can be part of sustaining structures of intention and agency. Networks can address the challenge of systemic power imbalance; encourage peer relationships, valuing everyone’s unique contribution. Network thinking can empower everyone to step into leadership roles. Networks reach across a diversity of stakeholders drawing them near to each other in adaptive interaction. Promoting network thinking in a group of passionate change practitioners can lead to changes at scale.

Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 245

3:30pm

Workshop: System Wholeness and Unity In Diversity within ISSS
2905   

Chairs
avatar for Thomas Wong

Thomas Wong

Founder, Researcher, Lecturer, clinical practitioner, Ancient Balance Medicine Research Institute
SIG Chair: Health and System Thinking SIG | | Bachelor of Engineering with First Class Honours in IT | Bachelor of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Master of Engineering in Telecommunication | Therapist of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deep Tissue pain therapy (1991-now) | Chair of Health and Systems Thinking SIG of ISSS (2008-now) | Liasion officer of C&W region, Auxiliary Medical Service HKSAR (2006-now) | Permanent Honorary President of... Read More →

Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:30pm - 5:00pm
ECCR 265

5:30pm

ISSS Council Meeting
Administrative Meeting: ISSS Council Meeting with dinner at C4C
Attendance:


  • Board Members

  • SIG Chairs

  • Trustees




Wednesday July 27, 2016 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Centre for Community Dining Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

5:30pm

Refresh and Dinner
Please find attached an Area Restaurant List which details:


  • opening hours

  • location

  • and phone numbers.


We hope that you enjoy Boulder's eateries!
 

Wednesday July 27, 2016 5:30pm - 6:45pm
Own Choice See attached PDF

7:00pm

Special Evening Dialogue: Robert M. Hutchins Memorial Dialogue on Anticipating Global Futures.
Robert M. Hutchins’ dialogues were centered on the idea that systems theory is needed to anticipate the future of human and natural systems and to advance science, governance, societal development, and educational systems. Continuing in the spirit of these dialogues, this will be an open, multi-faceted discussion about issues of sustainability in socio-ecological systems.

Speakers
avatar for Debora Hammond

Debora Hammond

Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies, Sonoma State University
Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Hutchins School of Liberal Studies at Sonoma State University since 1997. | Program Director of Organization Development Graduate Program since 2009. | Growing out of my on-going involvement with the International Society for the Systems Sciences, I was elected to serve as the 2005-2006 President and hosted the 50th anniversary conference at Sonoma State University, July 9-14, 2006. | My book on... Read More →
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert Rosen over the decade and a half prior to his death. After he passed away in 1998, she inherited all of her father's artistic and scientific work, both published and... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Benson 180
 
Thursday, July 28
 

7:00am

Breakfast
C4C Meal Cards


Thursday July 28, 2016 7:00am - 8:30am
Centre for Community Dining Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

7:15am

ISSS2016 Roundtable Reflection
Limited Capacity seats available

Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

PhD Human Science: Social and Institutional Change, Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems are GEMS
SIG Chair:  ISSS RoundTable Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science: social and institutional change by creating and researching the RoundTable. The Los Angeles RoundTable Development Team convenes monthly text-study RoundTables where all are welcome... Read More →


Thursday July 28, 2016 7:15am - 8:15am
Centre for Community (C4C) TreeHouse Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado

8:29am

Plenary VII: Engineering Sustainable Systems and Technology
e

Speakers
avatar for Rick Dove

Rick Dove

Paradigm Shift International, Inc. and Stevens Institute of Technology
Rick Dove is a leading researcher, practitioner, and educator of fundamental principles for agile enterprise, agile systems, and agile development processes. In 1991 he initiated the global interest in agility as co-PI on the seminal 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy project at Lehigh University. Subsequently he organized and led collaborative research at the DARPA-funded Agility Forum, involving 250 organizations and 1000... Read More →
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.
avatar for Diana Mann

Diana Mann

Principle Systems Engineer, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation
Diana Mann is Principle Systems Engineer at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation. She provides Systems Engineering and Project Engineering support to multiple programs and technology development projects, encompassing architecture and system-level analysis and design, requirements definition and management, project risk management, budget and schedule development and tracking, interface definition and control, technology and market... Read More →


Thursday July 28, 2016 8:29am - 8:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

8:30am

Anand Kumar: Reflections on the Tata Sustainability Journey
Chairs
avatar for Gary Smith

Gary Smith

Healthcare Ambassador, Systems Engineer at Airbus Group, INCOSE
Gary Smith is a senior expert in systems engineering at Airbus Defence and Space and INCOSE ESEP. He has been a lead systems architect for their border protection systems. He is an active contributor to the INCOSE/ISSS systems science working group and the healthcare working group where he participates as the outreach director for the EMEA region and is an INCOSE Healthcare Ambassador. In 2004, “just for fun”, he undertook the Open University... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Anand Kumar

Anand Kumar

Systems Achitecture and Engineering
Anand Kumar has more than 20 years of Industrial experience in Systems architecture and engineering. He has been a researcher in Architecture and Business systems for more than a decade. His interests are in Business Systems, Architecture and Digital Product-Service Systems. He has been part of the Tata journey for the last 12 years.


Thursday July 28, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:00am

Rick Dove: Enabling and Facilitating Engineered Sustainability
Engineered system solutions are confronting an increasing rate of evolution in their operational environments – bringing both threat and opportunity. Sustaining these systems requires enabling and facilitating a capability to evolve in concert. The agility of a system to respond effectively to evolutionary change is a function of its architecture, design, and operational behavior. We will look under the hood of effective examples, focusing on the enabling and facilitating design characteristics that manifest as resilience and composability. Comparisons will be made of natural system sustainability-mechanisms with artificial system analogs. The law of natural selection rules well beyond the organisms in the biosphere, with the operational environment harshly determining what is sustained. The points to be made come from 25 years of analyzing countless systems for common concepts that enable and facilitate sustainability, and more recently, application of these concepts to a critical need for agile security in the face of intelligent and determined agile adversaries.

Chairs
avatar for Gary Smith

Gary Smith

Healthcare Ambassador, Systems Engineer at Airbus Group, INCOSE
Gary Smith is a senior expert in systems engineering at Airbus Defence and Space and INCOSE ESEP. He has been a lead systems architect for their border protection systems. He is an active contributor to the INCOSE/ISSS systems science working group and the healthcare working group where he participates as the outreach director for the EMEA region and is an INCOSE Healthcare Ambassador. In 2004, “just for fun”, he undertook the Open University... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Rick Dove

Rick Dove

Paradigm Shift International, Inc. and Stevens Institute of Technology
Rick Dove is a leading researcher, practitioner, and educator of fundamental principles for agile enterprise, agile systems, and agile development processes. In 1991 he initiated the global interest in agility as co-PI on the seminal 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy project at Lehigh University. Subsequently he organized and led collaborative research at the DARPA-funded Agility Forum, involving 250 organizations and 1000... Read More →


Thursday July 28, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:30am

Diana Mann: The Global Water Energy Nexus
Chairs
avatar for Gary Smith

Gary Smith

Healthcare Ambassador, Systems Engineer at Airbus Group, INCOSE
Gary Smith is a senior expert in systems engineering at Airbus Defence and Space and INCOSE ESEP. He has been a lead systems architect for their border protection systems. He is an active contributor to the INCOSE/ISSS systems science working group and the healthcare working group where he participates as the outreach director for the EMEA region and is an INCOSE Healthcare Ambassador. In 2004, “just for fun”, he undertook the Open University... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Diana Mann

Diana Mann

Principle Systems Engineer, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation
Diana Mann is Principle Systems Engineer at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation. She provides Systems Engineering and Project Engineering support to multiple programs and technology development projects, encompassing architecture and system-level analysis and design, requirements definition and management, project risk management, budget and schedule development and tracking, interface definition and control, technology and market... Read More →


Thursday July 28, 2016 9:30am - 10:00am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

9:55am

Summary
Chairs
avatar for Gary Smith

Gary Smith

Healthcare Ambassador, Systems Engineer at Airbus Group, INCOSE
Gary Smith is a senior expert in systems engineering at Airbus Defence and Space and INCOSE ESEP. He has been a lead systems architect for their border protection systems. He is an active contributor to the INCOSE/ISSS systems science working group and the healthcare working group where he participates as the outreach director for the EMEA region and is an INCOSE Healthcare Ambassador. In 2004, “just for fun”, he undertook the Open University... Read More →

Thursday July 28, 2016 9:55am - 10:00am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:00am

Plenary VII: Q & A
Chairs
avatar for Gary Smith

Gary Smith

Healthcare Ambassador, Systems Engineer at Airbus Group, INCOSE
Gary Smith is a senior expert in systems engineering at Airbus Defence and Space and INCOSE ESEP. He has been a lead systems architect for their border protection systems. He is an active contributor to the INCOSE/ISSS systems science working group and the healthcare working group where he participates as the outreach director for the EMEA region and is an INCOSE Healthcare Ambassador. In 2004, “just for fun”, he undertook the Open University... Read More →

Thursday July 28, 2016 10:00am - 10:15am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:15am

Morning Break
Thursday July 28, 2016 10:15am - 10:30am
MATH Courtyard Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:29am

Plenary VIII: Prospects for Scientific Systemic Synthesis
Description: Recent times have seen the emergence of new theoretical insights that may help to establish the frameworks, theories and methodologies we need to understand, design, build, explain, communicate about, utilize or operate, maintain, and evolve resilient and sustainable socio-ecological systems.  In this panel we bring together experts to present on such emerging developments in the areas of engineering, science, research, practice and philosophy, and to reflect on how these different stands can contribute to the formation of a new systemic synthesis that will make the ‘whole systems perspective’ scientific and practical. The panel presentations will be delivered in the last plenary before lunch, and be followed by an open discussion between the panellists and audience in a break-out session immediately after lunch.    

Chair: *David Rousseau

Panelists:


  • Bill Shindel - The S* minimal general systems meta-model, and its prospects as a general modelling foundation for Systems Engineering.

  • Len Troncale - Systems Processes Theory (SPT) , and its prospects as a general theoretical core for a science of systems and sustainability.

  • John Kineman - The PAR/Holon Relational Framework, and its prospects as a general methodology for Systems Research

  • Jennifer Wilby - Systemic methodologies and the prospects for enhancing them on the basis of emerging general systems theories and models.

  • David Rousseau - Systems Philosophy and the prospects for employing scientific general systems principles as the foundation of a systems worldview.


Speakers
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →
avatar for Bill Shindel

Bill Shindel

Co-lead of two global industry teams, System Patterns Challenge Team and INCOSE Agile Systems Engineering Life Cycle Model Project
​William D. (Bill) Schindel is co-lead of two global industry teams: (1) the System Patterns Challenge Team, part of the Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Initiative of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), and (2) the INCOSE Agile Systems Engineering Life Cycle Model Project. His forty-year engineering career has included aerospace engineering with IBM Federal Systems, teaching engineering and mathematics at... Read More →
avatar for Len Troncale

Len Troncale

Director, General Systems Research, Development, and Consulting
Dr. Len Troncale is Professor Emeritus of Cell and Molecular Biology, and past Chairman of the Biology Department at California State Polytechnic University. He is also Director of the Institute for Advanced Systems Studies, and Coordinator of its NSF-supported Systems Integrated Science General Education Program. He has served as VP and Managing Director of the International Society for General Systems Research (SGSR), and President of the... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →


Thursday July 28, 2016 10:29am - 10:30am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:30am

Bill Schindel: The S* minimal general systems meta-model, and its prospects as a general modelling foundation for Systems Engineering.
Speakers
avatar for Bill Shindel

Bill Shindel

Co-lead of two global industry teams, System Patterns Challenge Team and INCOSE Agile Systems Engineering Life Cycle Model Project
​William D. (Bill) Schindel is co-lead of two global industry teams: (1) the System Patterns Challenge Team, part of the Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Initiative of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), and (2) the INCOSE Agile Systems Engineering Life Cycle Model Project. His forty-year engineering career has included aerospace engineering with IBM Federal Systems, teaching engineering and mathematics at... Read More →


Thursday July 28, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

10:55am

11:20am

John Kineman: The PAR/Holon Relational Framework and its prospects as a general methodology for Systems Research
Speakers
avatar for John Kineman

John Kineman

President (2015-2016), International Society for the System Sciences
Senior Research Scientist, CIRES, University of Colorado | Stellenbosch Research Fellow (2016), Stellenbosch South Africa | Adjunct Professor, Vignan University, Vadlamudi, India | President (2015-2016), International Society for the Systems Sciences | ISSS SIG Chair: Relational Science | | Dr. Kineman is an ecosystem scientist at the University of Colorado, currently developing a theory of whole systems (R-theory). He holds a Bachelors... Read More →


Thursday July 28, 2016 11:20am - 11:45am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

11:45am

Jennifer Wilby: Systemic methodologies and the prospects for enhancing them on the basis of emerging general systems theories and models.
Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Wilby

Jennifer Wilby

Vice-President Administration, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Administration (2011-2016), Trustee and Vice President (2008/9) for the International Society for the Systems Sciences. | SIG Chair:    Critical Systems Thinking and Practice. | Jennifer Wilby is an emeritus senior researcher in management systems and sciences in The Business School, University of Hull. Jennifer's research interests include: developing systems resilience and flexibility in the management of complex systems... Read More →


Thursday July 28, 2016 11:45am - 11:55am
MATH 100* Math Academic Building, University of Colorado

11:55am

12:10pm

12:15pm

Lunch
Thursday July 28, 2016 12:15pm - 1:30pm
Centre for Community Dining Centre for Community, Regent Drive, University of Colorado
  • Host Organization